Using the Atlas to Flip the Classroom

… one way of Using the Atlas

BloomsLearning2FlippedClassroomAtlas learning resources and the inverted classroom model of teaching

Many universities encourage instructors to experiment with the “flipped classroom” or “inverted classroom” pedagogical model.

According to Cynthia Brame (reference below), in terms of Bloom’s taxonomy (image on right) flipping the classroom involves requiring students to do more of the lower levels of cognitive work (gaining knowledge and comprehension) outside of class, and focusing on the higher forms of cognitive work (application, analysis, synthesis, and/or evaluation) in class, where they have the support of their peers and instructor. Brame notes that this model contrasts from the traditional model in which “first exposure” occurs via lecture in class, with students assimilating knowledge through homework; thus the term “flipped classroom.”

The Atlas concept entries are designed to facilitate the kind of outside-of-class learning envisaged in the flipped classroom model.

Source

Cynthia J. Brame, Flipping the Classroom, Vanderbilt University CFT Teaching Guide, at https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/flipping-the-classroom/, accessed 27 April 2016.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified 27 April 2016.

Image: Cynthia J. Brame, Flipping the Classroom, Vanderbilt University CFT Teaching Guide, at https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/flipping-the-classroom/, accessed 27 April 2016.