Working in Organizations

… a core topic in Leadership Skills and Atlas109
and study materials for Week 2 of Atlas206 Internship Reading

organizationTopic description

This topic introduces students to effective practices for working in organizations.

Note: In addition to elaborating a core topic in Leadership Skills and Atlas109, the concepts below constitute study materials for Week 2 of Atlas206 Internship Reading. The Atlas quiz can be found at Quiz 2 – Working in Organizations. All 15 quizzes for Atlas206 Internship Reading are available at Concept Quizzes for Atlas206 Internship Reading.

This topic addresses effective practices in the form of behaviours and skills that are relatively distinct from substantive expertise and leadership competencies, which are dealt with in other topics. In other words, we claim that, no matter what one’s level of substantive expertise and leadership ability happens to be, practicing more of the behaviours and skills listed in in the table below should make one more effective.

Most of the effective practices identified here can be seen in tabulations of behavioural competencies provided by employers. The three best examples we have come across to date are reproduced on the Atlas at: Michigan State Behavioral Competencies, CMHC Dictionary of Behavioural Competencies, and OECD Core Competencies.

Topic learning outcome

Upon completing this topic students should be able to apply a number of effective practices to enable them to be come more effective, more quickly, in working in organizations.

Core concepts that can be viewed as effective practices
10 EFFECTIVE PRACTICES FOR WORKING IN ORGANIZATIONS
Personal Behaviours
Operating Skills
Honesty

Dependability

Resourcefulness

Respectfulness

Friendliness

Punctuality

Orienting

Briefing and Minimizing Surprises

Clearing

Deadlining

Recommended 2 hours of study for Week 2 of Atlas206 Internship Reading

Concept pages above.

TrainingPoint, It’s All About Culture – What is Corporate Culture? 6-minute YouTube video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sO2vNyBroco, accessed 6 February 2016.

Michigan State University – Human Resources, Behavioral Competencies, on Atlas at Michigan State Behavioral Competencies, original at https://www.hr.msu.edu/performance/supportstaff/competencies.htm, accessed 15 February 2016.

Complete Quiz 2 – Working in Organizations.

Recommended 10 hours of study for Atlas109 Leadership and Communication

Concept pages above.

Complete Quiz 2 – Working in Organizations.

Richard Neustadt, 1971, Operational Skills, Note to Students in PP240, at http://www.atlas101.ca/pm/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Operational-Skills-Richard-Neustadt-Class-Memo-Kennedy-School-1971.pdf, accessed 10 February 2016.

Michigan State University – Human Resources, Behavioral Competencies, on Atlas at Michigan State Behavioral Competencies, original at https://www.hr.msu.edu/performance/supportstaff/competencies.htm, accessed 15 February 2016.

CMHC’s Dictionary of Behavioural Competencies, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, at http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/corp/ca/ouhipr/ouhipr_005.cfm, accessed 15 February 2016.

OECD Competency Framework, on Atlas at OECD Core Competencies, original at http://www.oecd.org/careers/competency_framework_en.pdf, accessed 7 January 2016.

Rob Asghar (2015), The Dependability Test: Are You The Office Flake?, Forbes 10 September 2015, at http://www.forbes.com/sites/robasghar/2015/09/10/the-dependability-test-are-you-the-office-flake/#64d6410c334b, accessed 15 February 2016.

Rob Goffee and Gareth Jones, 2009, Authentic Leadership – 3 Tenets and 4 Practices, Leadership Excellence Magazine, p 17-18, reproduced with permission at https://blessingwhite.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Authentic_Leadership_Goffee_Jones.pdf, accessed 8 February 2016.

BlessingWhite’s X-Model of Employee Engagement, 8-minute video at http://blessingwhite.com/video/2012/03/12/the-x-model-of-employee-engagement/, accessed 6 February 2016. (Comparing the goals of the organization and the individual with leads to six categories of employees: Engaged, Almost Engaged, Crash and Burners, Disengaged, Honeymooners, and Hamsters.)

TrainingPoint, It’s All About Culture – What is Corporate Culture? 6-minute YouTube video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sO2vNyBroco, accessed 6 February 2016.

Paul Puckridge, 7 Reasons Why Friendliness Is A Leadership Necessity, The Success Institute, at http://thesuccessinstitute.com.au/7-reasons-friendliness-leadership-necessity/, accessed 15 February 2016.

Boundless, “Honesty in Leadership: Kouzes and Posner.” Boundless Management, 21 July 2015 at https://www.boundless.com/management/textbooks/boundless-management-textbook/leadership-9/trait-approach-69/honesty-in-leadership-kouzes-and-posner-346-3944/.

Oprah.com http://www.oprah.com/relationships/When-to-Tell-the-Truth-Tell-the-Truth-or-Lie, accessed 14 February 2016.

Charles Green (2012), Why Trust is the New Core of Leadership, Forbes, 3 April 2012, at http://www.forbes.com/sites/trustedadvisor/2012/04/03/why-trust-is-the-new-core-of-leadership/#159968925e12, accessed 14 February 2016.

Bud Bilanich, Punctuality – the Politeness of Kings, and a Key to Positive Personal Impact, Your Career Mentor, at http://www.budbilanich.com/punctuality-the-politeness-of-kings-and-a-key-to-positive-personal-impact/, accessed 15 February 2016.

Team Tony, The Blueprint of Leadership – The 4 Qualities of Exceptional Leaders, at http://humanelevation.tonyrobbins.com/blog/leadership/the-blueprint-of-leadership, accessed 15 February 2016.

Dean Vella (2016), Why Respect is the Cornerstone of Effective Leadership, at http://www.thoughtleadersllc.com/2016/01/why-respect-is-the-cornerstone-of-effective-leadership/, accessed 15 February 2016.

MPP/MPA courses with resources on this topic

Albany PAD614 Managerial Leadership in the Public Sector, Jeffrey Straussman, syllabus at http://www.atlas101.ca/pm/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Straussman-PAD-614-Fall-2014.pdf, accessed 6 February 2016.

American PUAD650 Leadership for a Changing Workplace, Patrick Malone, syllabus at http://www.atlas101.ca/pm/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/PUAD-650-001-Syllabus-Malone-Sp-2015.pdf, accessed 6 February 2016.

Harvard MLD617M Learning from Effective Implementers – Managing Self, Frank Hartmann, at http://www.hks.harvard.edu/syllabus/MLD-617M.pdf, accessed 6 February 2016.

Harvard MLD602 Performance Leadership – Producing Results in Public and Nonprofit Agencies, Bob Behn, at http://www.hks.harvard.edu/syllabus/MLD-602.pdf, accessed 6 February 2016.

NYU PADM2116 Developing Management Skills, Syllabi available at http://wagner.nyu.edu/courses/padm-gp.2116#tabs-2, accessed 6 February 2016.

NYU PADM2131 Organizational and Managerial Development, Syllabi available at http://wagner.nyu.edu/courses/padm-gp.2131#tabs-2, accessed 6 February 2016.

NYU PADM4112 Building Effective Teams, Charlotte Wagenberg, Syllabi available at http://wagner.nyu.edu/courses/padm-gp.4112#tabs-2, accessed 6 February 2016.

NYU EXEC3190 Leadership Confronted, Syllabi available at http://wagner.nyu.edu/courses/exec-gp.3190#tabs-2, accessed 6 February 2016.

UCLA PP209 Management in the 21st Century, Kimberley Ling Murtaugh, syllabus at http://www.atlas101.ca/pm/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/PP209.pdf, accessed 6 February 2016.

UCLA PPM228 Leadership and Management of Nonprofit Organizations, Bill Parent, syllabus at http://www.atlas101.ca/pm/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Falll-2015-PPM228.pdf, accessed 6 February 2016.

Recommended readings in MPP and MPA courses 

Joseph S. Nye, Hard Power, Soft Power and Leadership, at http://www.hks.harvard.edu/netgov/files/talks/docs/11_06_06_seminar_Nye_HP_SP_Leadership.pdf, accessed 25 December 2015.

Christopher Meyer, How the right measures help teams excel, Harvard Business Review, May-June 1994, at https://hbr.org/1994/05/how-the-right-measures-help-teams-excel, accessed 25 December 2015.

Andrew Hargadon & Robert Sutton, Building an Innovation Factory, Harvard Business Review, May-June 2000, at https://hbr.org/2000/05/building-an-innovation-factory-2, accessed 25 December 2015.

Lynda Gratton, Andreas Voigt, and Tamara Erickson, Bridging Faultlines in Diverse Teams, HBR Case at https://hbr.org/product/bridging-faultlines-in-diverse-teams/SMR250-PDF-ENG, accessed 25 December 2015.

Kathleen Eisenhardt, Jean Kahwajy & L.J. Bourgeois, How management teams can have a good fight, Harvard Business Review, July-August 1997, at https://hbr.org/1997/07/how-management-teams-can-have-a-good-fight, accessed 25 December 2015.

Amy Edmondson & Diana Smith, Too hot to handle? How to manage relationship conflict, HBR Case Study, at https://hbr.org/product/too-hot-to-handle-how-to-managerelationship-conflict/an/CMR349-PDF-ENG, accessed 25 December 2015.

Hollingshead, Andrea B. and Wittenbaum, Gwen and Botero, Isabel C., From Cooperative to Motivated Information Sharing in Groups: Moving Beyond the Hidden Profile Paradigm (2004). Communication Monographs, Vol. 7, No. 3, 2004. Available at SSRN: Abstract at http://ssrn.com/abstract=1802127 and full paper at http://poseidon01.ssrn.com/delivery.php?ID=316105111106004098000125107096029094097057069013079039085087068107105001122071087075054034098101102014042111122095068107107101037027053089084024119077086064114098037033035091071081019024011075018075019020110022119074079015013112027021083065123082007&EXT=pdf.

Amy C. Edmondson, Richard M.J. Bohmer, and Gary P. Pisano, Speeding up Team Learning, Harvard Business Review, October 2001, at https://hbr.org/2001/10/speeding-up-team-learning/ar/1, accessed 25 December 2015.

Literature on teams: See Additional reading in Charlotte Wagenberg’s syllabus at http://wagner.nyu.edu/files/syllabi/201209/PADM-GP.4112.001.pdf, accessed 6 February 2016.

Concept comprehension questions

CCQ206.01.01. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term orienting choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. An individual who is oriented can identify and create opportunities to initiate new connections that will facilitate the achievement of strategic goals within own area.

b. An individual who is oriented understands the relationships, concerns and agendas of key people, and decisions made inside and outside of their own work group.

c. Orienting is defined as seeking an expression of assent from others for something you propose.

d. Orienting is defined as positioning with respect to a reference system or determining your bearings physically or intellectually.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.02.01. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term honesty choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Honesty is a facet of moral character that connotes positive and virtuous attributes.

b. The need for honesty is woven throughout the primary activities of effective leaders.

c. Ethical behaviour in social settings, including working in organizations, does not include the expectation that one should tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth at all times in all circumstances.

d. A key characteristic of an honest leader is one who recognizes, respects and values the differences among colleagues and clients.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.02.02. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term dependability choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Dependability is being able to be trusted to do or provide what is needed.

b. An individual who is dependable is able to deal well with new or difficult situations and to find solutions to problems

c. Undependable behaviours do not build trust or help one work effectively in an organization.

d. Indicators of dependability include: completing work in a timely manner and meeting commitments with little oversight.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.02.03. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term resourcefulness choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. An individual who demonstrates resourcefulness gets the job done by doing whatever it takes within an appropriate time frame.

b. Resourcefulness is being able to deal well with new or difficult situations and to find solutions to problems.

c. An individual who demonstrates resourcefulness anticipates critical issues and requirements to help set appropriate work objectives.

d. An individual who demonstrates resourcefulness believes and assumes the best in others.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.02.04. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term respectfulness choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Respectfulness is a facet of moral character that connotes positive and virtuous attributes such as integrity, truthfulness, and straightforwardness, along with the absence of lying, cheating, or theft.

b. A person who demonstrates respectfulness treats all people with dignity.

c. A person who demonstrates respectfulness identifies and works to develop the relevant skills, knowledge and behaviours to work effectively with the differences among individual staff and clients.

d. Respectfulness is a courteous regard for people’s feelings.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.02.05. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term friendliness choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. An individual who demonstrates friendliness has the ability to keep one’s emotions under control and restrain negative actions when faced with opposition or hostility from others or when working under stress.

b. An individual who demonstrates friendliness seeks best practices inside and outside the organisation to anticipate change.

c. A reputation for friendliness can be defined as a feeling of liking for another person; enjoyment in their company.

d. An individual who demonstrates friendliness has the ability to hear accurately and understand unspoken, partly expressed thoughts, feelings and concerns of others.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.02.06. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term punctuality choose the one that is most valid or choose e if none are reasonably valid.

a. Punctuality is a rather minor behaviour rarely mentioned in lists of expected organizational behaviours.

b. Punctuality can be is defined as able to be trusted to do or provide what is needed.

c. Punctuality can be defined as the quality or habit of adhering to an appointed time.

d. Punctuality can be defined as positioning with respect to a reference system or determining your bearings physically or intellectually.

e. None of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.02.07. Among the statements a-d pertaining to briefing and minimizing surprises choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Briefing can be defined as the art of informing your client first and then informing yourself.

b. Briefing yourself is bound to be different from briefing others.

c. One of the crucial challenges in briefing is the admonition of No Surprises.

d. No superior or colleague likes to be surprised, especially in the presence of others, about a fact that a subordinate is aware of or an action the subordinate is undertaking.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.02.08. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term clearing choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Clearing can be done through coalition-building, a search for viable consensus among allies.

b. Clearing has been defined as seeking an expression of assent from others for something you propose.

c. Compliance with procedures and binding your position, is an example of clearing.

d. A person who demonstrates clearing has the ability to keep one’s emotions under control and restrain negative actions when faced with opposition.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.02.09. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term deadlining choose the one that is

a. Deadlines are requirements for given sorts of action at set times.

b. Deadlining can be defined as meeting your commitments.

c. Deadlines help to force actions through channels they are to be ridden by those seeking action and ducked by those seeking the opposite.

d. Some deadlines, not all, can be brought into being at will; some can be advanced in time, some can be postponed, some can be strengthened, some weakened, some cancelled, some evaded.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified on 21 April 2017.

Image: Program Success, at https://programsuccess.wordpress.com/2013/03/01/the-best-structure-to-work-under-for-the-project-manager/, accessed on 8 February 2016.