Managing Oneself

… a core topic in Leadership Skills and Atlas109
and study materials for Week 13 of Atlas206 Internship Reading

selfmanagementTopic description

This topic introduces students to effective practices for managing one’s emotional, physical and social self in a public management career.

Note: In addition to elaborating a core topic in Leadership Skills and Atlas109, the concepts below constitute study materials for Week 13 of Atlas206 Internship Reading. The Atlas quiz can be found at Quiz 13 – Recognizing Values and Managing Oneself. All 15 quizzes for Atlas206 Internship Reading are available at Concept Quizzes for Atlas206 Internship Reading.

Topic learning outcome

Upon completion of this topic students should be able to apply a number of effective practices to better manage themselves in a public management career.

Core concepts that can be viewed as effective practices
9 EFFECTIVE PRACTICES FOR MANAGING ONESELF
Activating Ambition

Becoming Self-aware

Developing Resilience

Finding Balance

Having Fun

Managing Stress

Managing Time

Overcoming Procrastination

Taking Responsibility

Recommended 2 hours of study for Week 12 of Atlas206 Internship Reading

Concept pages in Recognizing Values and Managing Oneself

Jonathan Haidt (2012), The Righteous Mind: Why good people are divided by politics and religion. Random House, Toronto, Chapter 7, at http://righteousmind.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/ch07.RighteousMind.final_.pdf, accessed 9 January 2016.

Jonathan Haidt (2012), “Religion, evolution, and the ecstasy of self-transcendence.” http://www.ted.com/talks/jonathan_haidt_humanity_s_stairway_to_self_transcendence.html

The MindTools Editorial Team, Developing Resilience – Overcoming and Growing From Setbacks, at https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/resilience.htm, accessed 23 February 2016.

Susan Heathfield, Take Responsibility for Your Life, at http://humanresources.about.com/od/success/qt/responsible_s5.htm, accessed 16 February 2016.

Complete Quiz 13 – Recognizing Values and Managing Oneself.

Recommended 10 hours of study for Atlas109 Leadership and Communication

Concept pages above and concept comprehension questions at bottom of this page.

Gaurav Sharma, 10 July 2015, Book review: HBR’s 10 Must Reads – On Managing Yourself, LinkedIn Pulse, at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/book-review-hbrs-10-must-reads-managing-yourself-gaurav-sharma, accessed 17 February 2016.

Nathaniel Foote, Russell Eisenstat, and Tobias Fredberg (2011), The Higher-Ambition Leader, Harvard Business Review, September, 2011, at https://hbr.org/2011/09/the-higher-ambition-leader, accessed 21 February 2016.

Sylvia Hewlett and Melinda Marshall (2011), Does Female Ambition Require Sacrifice? at https://hbr.org/2011/02/does-female-ambition-require-a, accessed 21 February 2016.

Orit Gadiesh and Julie Coffman (2015), Companies Drain Women’s Ambition After Only 2 Years, Harvard Business Review, 18 May 2015, at https://hbr.org/2015/05/companies-drain-womens-ambition-after-only-2-years, accessed 21 February 2016.

Sheryl Sandberg (2010), Why we have to few women leaders, TED Talk (with almost 6 million views), at http://www.ted.com/talks/sheryl_sandberg_why_we_have_too_few_women_leaders, accessed 21 February 2016.

Anthony K Tjan (2012), How Leaders Become Self-Aware, Harvard Business Review, 19 July 2012, at https://hbr.org/2012/07/how-leaders-become-self-aware/, accessed 21 February 2016.

The MindTools Editorial Team, Developing Resilience – Overcoming and Growing From Setbacks, at https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/resilience.htm, accessed 23 February 2016.

David Kopans (2016), How to Evaluate, Manage, and Strengthen Your Resilience, Harvard Business Review, 14 June 2016, at https://hbr.org/2016/06/how-to-evaluate-manage-and-strengthen-your-resilience, accessed 30 August 2016.

Workplace Mental Health Promotion, A How-To Guide, Work-Life Balance, at http://wmhp.cmhaontario.ca/workplace-mental-health-core-concepts-issues/issues-in-the-workplace-that-affect-employee-mental-health/work-life-balance, accessed 21 February 2016.

Canadian Mental Health Association, Work-Life Balance Quiz, at http://www.cmha.ca/mental_health/work-life-balance-quiz/#balance-quiz and Work-Life Balance: Make It Your Business, at http://www.cmha.ca/mental_health/work-life-balance-make-it-your-business/, accessed 21 February 2016.

Ian D Clark (2008), Bending rules, making connections and having fun: potential elements for a strategy to advance public service innovation, Presentation to a Symposium on Innovation, Risk and Control at the University Seminar Canada School of Public Service Ottawa, 8 May 2008, at http://atlas101.ca/ic/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Bending-rules-making-connections-and-having-fun.pdf, accessed 21 February 2016.

The MindTools Editorial Team, What is Stress? at https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTCS_00.htm, accessed 21 February 2016.

MindTools, Prioritization – Making Best Use of Your Time and Resources, at https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newHTE_92.htm, accessed 16 February 2016.

Ron Friedman (2015), 9 Productivity Tips from People Who Write About Productivity, Harvard Business Review, 31 December 2015, at https://hbr.org/2015/12/9-productivity-tips-from-people-who-write-about-productivity, accessed 7 March 2016.

Richard Neustadt (1971), Operational Skills, Note to Students in PP240, at http://www.atlas101.ca/pm/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Operational-Skills-Richard-Neustadt-Class-Memo-Kennedy-School-1971.pdf, accessed 10 February 2016.

Jeremy Dean, 10 Foolproof Tips for Overcoming Procrastination, at MindTools, Prioritization – Making Best Use of Your Time and Resources, at http://www.spring.org.uk/2014/03/10-foolproof-tips-for-overcoming-procrastination.php, accessed 6 March 2016.

Susan Heathfield, Take Responsibility for Your Life, at http://humanresources.about.com/od/success/qt/responsible_s5.htm, accessed 16 February 2016.

MPP/MPA program sites with resources on this topic

[TO COME]

Recommended readings in MPP and MPA courses 

From Toronto PPG2014

ABC Interview with Lean In author, Sheryl Sandberg. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NK28iM41bw. This 9 minute interview is the required item. Also of interenest are Sandberg’s TED talk at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18uDutylDa4 and Ken Auletta’s profile, the New Yorker: “A woman’s place,” July 11, 2011. [link here: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/07/11/110711fa_fact_auletta]

Michael Friscolanti, Asking all the right questions, Maclean’s, April 11, 2011 (profile of Toronto Blue Jays General Manager Alex Anthopoulos). [link here: http://www2.macleans.ca/2011/03/30/asking-all-the-right-questions/]

George Packer, All the angry people, The New Yorker, December 5, 2011 (profile of Occupy Wall Street protester Ray Kachel). [link here: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/12/05/111205fa_fact_packer]

David Brooks, How to Fight the Man, in New York Times, February 2, 2012 [link here: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/03/opinion/brooks-how-to-fight-the-man.html]

Michael Ignatieff. (2013.) Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics, Chapter 2, Ambition, pages 7-31. Random House Canada, Toronto.

Fog of War (entire movie)

Concept comprehension questions

CCQ206.13.05. Among the statements a-d pertaining to activating ambition choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Ambition is defined as an ardent desire for work; it can also be defined as a desire to achieve a particular end.

b. True leaders do not need to be ambitious in order to succeed.

c. Although activating ambition in leaders is usually good for the enterprise, it is worth noting how this is likely to affect the other elements of managing oneself.

d. Orit Gadiesh and Julie Coffman conducted a study on the differences between the ambitions of men and women and found that women with two years or less of work experience slightly led men in ambition.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.13.06. Among the statements a-d pertaining to becoming self-aware choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Anthony Tjan, writing in the HBR, says that his research finds that self-awareness the “one quality that trumps all, evident in virtually every great entrepreneur, manager, and leaders” and advises that the “best thing leaders can do to improve their effectiveness is to become more aware of what motivates them and their decision-making.”

b. Personal control – spending your time and resources by focusing on events you have control over – is essential for becoming self-aware.

c. Self-awareness is about understanding your own needs, desires, failings, habits, and everything else that makes you tick.

d. Being self-aware allows you to understand other people, how they perceive you, your attitude and your responses to them in the moment.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.13.07. Among the statements a-d pertaining to developing resilience choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Resilience is the ability to recover from or adjust easily to misfortune or change and developing resilience is important for effective self management.

b. Indicators of resilience include following through on commitments and making promises that can be kept.

c. Resilient people view a difficulty as a challenge, not as a paralyzing event, and they look at their failures and mistakes as lessons to be learned from, and as opportunities for growth.

d. Resilient people have a positive image of the future – they maintain a positive outlook, and envision brighter days ahead.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.13.07. Among the statements a-d pertaining to finding balance choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. A proper work-life balance can be defined as a state of well-being that a person can reach or can set as a goal in order to allow them to manage effectively multiple responsibilities at work.

b. A tip for staying balanced at work is at the end of each day, set your priorities for the following day.

c. An tip for finding balanced at home is exercising, even if it’s only for 15 minutes.

d. A tip for staying balanced at work is to respond to emails when they arrive rather than letting them accumulate throughout the day.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.13.08. Among the statements a-d pertaining to having fun at work choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Actions to promote having fun at the workplace need to be endorsed at the corporate level.

b. We get an emotional reward from interacting harmoniously with others.

c. One goal in managing oneself is to find professional assignments and colleagues where one can have fun at work.

d. Working with interesting colleagues and working on intellectually challenging problems activate the “happiness hormones” in your brain.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.13.09. Among the statements a-d pertaining to managing stress choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Hans Selye, one of the founding fathers of stress research, described stress as not necessarily something bad – the stress of exhilarating, creative successful work is beneficial, while that of failure, humiliation or infection is detrimental.

b. An important goal in managing oneself is maintain work-related stress to levels that do not jeopardize one’s health and effectiveness.

c. Tips for reducing stress include physical activity, relaxation techniques, and getting more sleep.

d. Tips for reducing stress include taking control, learning to say no, and managing your time.

e. All of a-d are invalid.

CCQ206.13.10. Among the statements a-d pertaining to managing time choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. One method of counteracting priority dilution involves having a strategy in place for saying no in advance.

b. Time management, or prioritization, is the way that one organizes and plans how long to spend on specific activities.

c. A tip for effective time-management is to ask yourself, “How can I use my time today in ways that create more time tomorrow?”

d. A tip for effective time-management is to speed up the implementation of all tasks.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.13.11. Among the tips a-d pertaining to overcoming procrastination choose the one that appears implausible or choose e if all are reasonably plausible.

a. Start easy – The first tip is simply to start with whatever is easy, manageable and doesn’t fill your mind with a nameless dread.

b. Start anywhere – The trouble with ‘starting easy’ is that it can be difficult to know where to start: there might be several easy bits, or it might be difficult to tell what should be done and what shouldn’t.

c. Think concrete – When you are getting started on a task, it’s much better to think about the concrete steps you are going to take, rather than abstract aims and ideas. Thinking concrete helps you get started.

d. Think it through – It is important to be sure that the task will succeed before starting.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.13.12. Among the statements a-d pertaining to taking responsibility choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Taking responsibility involves accepting personal accountability for one’s actions and commitments.

b. It is crucial to distinguish between which aspect of your life are the responsibility of others and which parts are totally your own responsibility.

c. Indicators of taking responsibility are: following through on commitments and only making promises that can be kept.

d. A foundation principle for success and happiness in life and work is that “you are totally responsible for your life.”

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified on 18 April 2017.

Image: LinkedIn Pulse, Book Review, at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/book-review-hbrs-10-must-reads-managing-yourself-gaurav-sharma, accessed on 17 February 2016.