Interests and the Policy Process

… a core topic in Policy Analysis and Process and Atlas101

Topic description

This topic examines the role of interests in shaping policy outcomes.

Topic learning outcome

Upon completing this topic the student will be familiar with the major frameworks for analyzing the role of interests in shaping policy outcomes, and with the concepts listed below.

Core concepts associated with this topic
Interests Pal’s Glossary of Conceptualizing Interests in Policymaking
Candidate entries in Old Atlas

Knowledge Networks; Regulatory Capture; Third Sector; StakeholdersPolicy ActorMoral Suasion; Social Movement; Think-Tanks; Advocacy Group; Civil Society; Interest Aggregation; Interest Group; Lobbying.

Recommended readings for 8 hours of preparation

TO COME

Recommended readings in MPP and MPA courses

University of Toronto PPG1001

Lemann, Nicholas. 2008. “Conflict of Interests.” The New Yorker (11 August).

Dahl, Robert. 2005 [1961]. “Overview: Actual and Potential Influence,” in Who Governs? Democracy and Power in An American City, 2nd ed., pp. 271-275. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Stone, Deborah. 2012. “Interests,” in Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making, 3rd ed., pp. 229-247. New York: W. W. Norton and Co.

Concept comprehension questions

CCQ206.08.08. Among the statements a-d pertaining to interests choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Theodore Benditt noted that some writers take the concept of interests to be the central notion in politics, and he enumerated seven accounts of interests in political theory.

b. Benditt’s seven accounts of interests in political theory include feelings or attitudes and wants.

c. Benditt’s seven accounts of interests in political theory include relationships or communities.

d. Benditt’s seven accounts of interests in political theory include changes that affect one advantageously or disadvantageously.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.08.09. Among the statements a-d pertaining to Pal’s Glossary of Conceptualizing Interests in Policymaking choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. The iron triangle is the stable and cozy relationships among congressional committees, executive agencies, and economic interest groups.

b. A policy community can be viewed as the actors in a policy network, who share at least some common language and conceptual reference points but who may be opponents on the issue.

c. An advocacy coalition is a group of individuals and/or organizations that have agreed to support a position that advances the public interest rather than private interests.

d. An epistemic community is a concept originally developed in international relations to characterize the influence of international groups of scientific experts on policymaking.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified on 22 May 2017.

Image: Peace and Political Buttons from TieDyes.com, at http://apgovernment2010.yolasite.com/ch1.php, accessed 26 March 2017.