Designing the Delivery Model

… a core topic in Implementation and Delivery and Atlas107

Topic description

This topic examines techniques for designing the delivery model for implementing a government initiative.

Topic learning outcome

Upon completing this topic the student will be familiar with techniques for designing the delivery model for implementing a government initiative, and be familiar with the definitional concepts listed below.

Core concepts associated with this topic [DRAFT]
Bardach’s Things Governments Do

Doing Nothing as a Policy Instrument

Using Information-Based Policy Instruments

Using Expenditure-Based Policy Instruments

Using Taxation-Based Policy Instruments

Using Regulation-Based Policy Instruments

Using Direct Provision as a Policy Instrument

Open access readings for 8 hours of preparation

The Atlas pages for the concept entries noted above.

MORE TO COME

Recommended readings in MPP and MPA courses

Toronto PPG1007 Putting Policy into Action – Strategic Implementation of Public Objectives

TO COME

Concept comprehension questions

CCQ206.09.25. Among the statements a-d pertaining to doing nothing as a policy instrument choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Failing to act on a perceived policy problem is sure sign of lack of policy capacity.

b. Problem-related rationales can occur when there is either no problem after all or a problem not within the government’s current priorities, jurisdiction, or capacities.

c. Rationales comprise a coherent set of considerations that should be part of any systematic process of instrument choice, even though doing nothing does not seem intuitively to fit the notion of an instrument or tool.

d. A deliberate choice not to intervene, made after an analysis of the problem, should be considered a policy decision – what is called a static response.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.09.26. Among the statements a-d pertaining to using information-based policy instruments choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. A key principle behind information-based instruments is that human behaviour is largely based on knowledge, beliefs, and values.

b. Information-based instruments are considered the most coercive of all policy instruments.

c. Information-based policy instruments can include flyers, pamphlets, booklets, training, advertisements, reports, websites, and portals.

d. Information-based policy instruments comprise government-directed attempts at influencing people through transfer of knowledge, and communication of reasoned argument.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.09.27. Among the statements a-d pertaining to using expenditure-based policy instruments choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. With expenditure-based policy instruments, governments are not trying to achieve their objectives or outcomes by changing the information that undergirds behaviour, but rather the calculus of costs, benefits, and financial resources.

b. In Canadian usage, contributions are similar to grants but with fewer conditions attached.

c. Expenditure instruments pose substantial management challenges in terms of ensuring that conditions are met and monies are spent appropriately.

d. From the policymaker’s point of view, virtually every policy instrument involves expenditure.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.09.28. Among the statements a-d pertaining to using taxation-based policy instruments choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Tax expenditures accomplish much the same thing as contributions or subsidies, but through the mechanism of reducing taxes for specific activities and thereby increasing the benefits.

b. A tax used as a policy instrument and not simply to raise revenue is a device to make targeted behaviours more expensive and hence, less attractive.

c. Through user charges and service fees, special benefits enjoyed by only a minority of citizens are paid for in whole or in part by that minority.

d. Tax expenditures are attractive for many governments because, with cash-based accounting, they do not affect the deficit.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.09.29. Among the statements a-d pertaining to using regulation-based policy instruments choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Regulation draws on the most fundamental resource a government has – its capacity to command and prohibit.

b. Affirmative/promoting uses of regulation include permissions, licences, recognitions, and self-regulation.

c. Regulatory instruments are used to define norms, acceptable behavior, or to limit activities in a given society.

d. A species of regulation is government-sanctioned self-regulation, where the state delegates its regulatory power not to a state agency but to a nongovernmental organization or association, for example a professional body.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.09.30. Among the statements a-d pertaining to using direct provision as a policy instrument choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Any service directly provided by government, from garbage collection to education, will involve the expenditure of often substantial amounts of money.

b. Direct provision draws on the most fundamental resource a government has: its capacity to command and prohibit.

c. Direct provision is less an alternative to spending money than it is a means of spending money that reflects a different policy logic.

d. Governments can decide to achieve the conditions or service goals they have in mind by marshalling their own resources toward those ends.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified on 22 May 2017.

Image: Pinterest.com, Logic Models, at https://www.pinterest.com/dalesaun/logic-models/, accessed 23 March 2017.