Building Resources

… a core topic in Leadership Skills and Atlas 109
and study materials for Week 3 of Atlas206 Internship Reading

BuildingResourcesTopic description

This topic introduces students to the principles and techniques of building resources to advance a goal.

Note: In addition to elaborating a core topic in Leadership Skills and Atlas109, the concepts below constitute study materials for Week 3 of Atlas206 Internship Reading. The Atlas quiz can be found at Quiz 3 – Building Resources. All 15 quizzes for Atlas206 Internship Reading are available at Concept Quizzes for Atlas206 Internship Reading.

Topic learning outcome

Upon completion of this topic students should be familiar with the basic principles and effective practices of building resources and be able to apply them to public management problems.

Core concepts associated with this topic
7 EFFECTIVE PRACTICES FOR BUILDING RESOURCES
Networking

Identifying Allies

Gaining Standing

Meeting in Person 

Creating a Coalition

Creating a Team

Conducting a Meeting

Recommended 2 hours of study for Week 3 of Atlas206 Internship Reading

Concept pages above.

Rene Shimada Siegel, 5 Reasons You Need to Meet in Person, My clients are just like yours: They want to Skype, email and text. But here’s why you still need face time, Inc., 29 February 2012, at http://www.inc.com/rene-siegel/five-reasons-you-need-to-meet-in-person.html, accessed 3 March 2016.

Complete Quiz 3 – Building Resources.

Recommended 10 hours of study for Atlas109 Leadership and Communication

Concept pages above.

Complete Quiz 3 – Building Resources.

Marshall Ganz (2011). Public Narrative, Collective Action, and Power, Chapter 18 in Accountability Through Public Opinion: From Inertia to Public Action, Edited by Sina Odugbemi and Taeku Lee (Washington, DC: The World Bank), p. 273-289, at http://marshallganz.usmblogs.com/files/2012/08/Public-Narrative-Collective-Action-and-Power.pdf, accessed 6 January 2016.

Marcia J. Simmering, Meeting Management, Reference for Business, at http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/management/Mar-No/Meeting-Management.html, accessed 4 March 2016.

Gillian Kaye, Conducting Effective Meetings, Community Tool Box, at http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/leadership/group-facilitation/main, accessed 4 March 2016.

Boyd Childress, revised by Wendy Mason, Coalition Building, Encyclopedia of Management, at http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/management/Bun-Comp/Coalition-Building.html, accessed 2 March 2016.

Phil Rabinowitz, Coalition Building I – Starting a Coalition, Community Toolbox, at http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/assessment/promotion-strategies/start-a-coaltion/main, accessed 2 March 2016.

Community Tool Box (University of Kansas), Some Lessons Learned on Community Organization and Change, at http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/overview/model-for-community-change-and-improvement/lessons-learned/main, accessed 2 January 2016.

Community Tool Box (University of Kansas), Databases of Best Practices, at http://ctb.ku.edu/en/databases-best-practices, accessed 2 January 2016.

Stephanie Newell and Hal Kirkwood, Teams, Encyclopedia of Business, at http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/encyclopedia/Str-The/Teams.html, accessed 2 March 2016.

Phil Rabinowitz, Building Teams – Broadening the Base for Leadership, Community Toolbox, at http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/leadership/leadership-ideas/team-building/main, accessed 2 March 2016.

Ed Wadud, Recognizing Allies, Community Toolbox, at http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/advocacy/advocacy-principles/recognize-allies/main, accessed 29 February 2016.

Rene Shimada Siegel, 5 Reasons You Need to Meet in Person, My clients are just like yours: They want to Skype, email and text. But here’s why you still need face time, Inc., 29 February 2012, at http://www.inc.com/rene-siegel/five-reasons-you-need-to-meet-in-person.html, accessed 3 March 2016.

Bill Berkowitz, Making Personal Contact with Potential Participants, Community Tool Box, at http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/participation/encouraging-involvement/participant-contact/main, accessed 3 March 2016.

Jonathan in General, 10 Tips for Effective Networking, Paid to Exist, at https://paidtoexist.com/10-tips-for-effective-networking/, accessed 4 March 2016.

Amy Fontinelle, Four Career Networking Tips that Work, Forbes, at http://www.forbes.com/2010/05/25/career-networking-tips-personal-finance-network.html, accessed 4 March 2016.

John E. Kobara and Melinda Smith, M.A., Job Networking Tips – How to Find the Right Job by Building Relationships, HelpGuide.Org, at http://www.helpguide.org/articles/work-career/job-networking-tips.htm, accessed 4 March 2016.

Recommended readings in MPP and MPA courses 

From Toronto PPG2014

Richard Sennett. (2012.) Together: The Rituals, Pleasures and Politics of Cooperation, Chapter 2, The Fragile Balance, pages 65-95. Yale University Press, New Haven.

Moneyball, Movie, (particularly the first one third), see trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bQOTkVmm5A.

Concept comprehension questions

CCQ206.01.02. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term networking choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Networking should consist of give-and-take relationships.

b. Successful networking involves making it a personal practice to view every situation – both inside and outside of the work environment – as an opportunity to meet new people.

c. Networking is the ongoing process of cultivating and maintaining relationships with a diverse network of individuals and organisations who share a common set of principles and values.

d. Networking is the process of intentionally meeting people, making contacts, and forming relationships in hopes of gaining access to such business-related benefits as career advice, job leads, business referrals, useful information and ideas, and emotional support.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.03.01. Among the statements a-d pertaining to identifying allies choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Ask known allies to list several other groups who are either already working on the issue or who might be interested in helping.

b. The next question to ask is which potential allies cares about the issue enough to want to help the project.

c. The easiest way to start recruiting allies is to determine if there are already groups working on the issue, who might be interested in becoming involved with the project.

d. One way to prioritize the list of potential allies is to rank them by the amount of power that they could potentially bring to the project because such a ranking rarely changes as the project progresses.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.03.02. Among the statements a-d pertaining to gaining standing choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Build your network because it’s always helpful to have a strong network of fellow professionals who know you, trust you, and believe in you.

b. Embrace the power of your difference because when your background is different than others you see the world in different ways.

c. Make your expertise undeniable by starting with a niche because, although it can be hard to be recognized as an expert if you’re a generalist, if you can demonstrate a superior knowledge of a narrow subject then once others recognize your expertise they will be more likely to listen to you on a variety of related subjects.

d. Share your knowledge because one of the best ways to convince skeptics of your merits is to prove you know what you’re doing.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.03.03. Among the statements a-d pertaining to meeting in person choose the one that is invalid or choose e If all are reasonably valid.

a. If the meeting is important, do not rely solely on sending an email request for a meeting.

b. Recognize the importance of first impressions when you prepare for a meeting.

c. Starting with small talk can build a relationship between those who are speaking.

d. You can usually rely on emails to arrange a first time meeting with someone worth meeting.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.03.04. Among the statements a-d pertaining to creating a coalition choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Coalitions should be unnecessary in organizations with well established lines of authority and communication.

b. Coalitions are a potent force in organizations.

c. Coalitions take time to form as participants identify the common goal and the best manner to approach that goal.

d. Coalition building can be viewed from an interdisciplinary perspective drawing on insights from organizational behaviour, social psychology, and political science.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.03.05. Among the statements a-d pertaining to creating a team choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. A team is a collection of individuals organized to accomplish a common purpose, who are interdependent, and who can be identified by themselves and observers as a team.

b. Five stages of team development can be characterized as forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning.

c. When personal conflicts arise, it is usually preferable to give them time sort themselves out on their own because attempts to address them explicitly will almost always jeopardize team morale.

d. A clear direction, clear responsibilities and knowledgeable members are characteristics of effective teams.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.03.06. Among the statements a-d pertaining to conducting a meeting choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. In planning a meeting, one should consider the goal or purpose of the meeting and be sure to invite those members of the organization who have the information or opinions necessary for the meeting.

b. Meetings are often the most effective way to manage projects, manage people, interact with clients, and to address workplace problems.

c. There are situations in which bringing a large group together to address an issue may cause further confusion and conflict.

d. It is usually preferable to avoid a printed agenda because this tends to overly formalize the proceedings and suppresses spontaneity.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified on 21 April 2017.

Image: GO Futures, at http://gofutureshr.com/employer-services/human-resources/, accessed 3 March 2016.