Quiz 1007.10 – Presenting and Speaking

… an Atlas quiz for Toronto PPG1007 Strategic Implementation

Concept comprehension questions on
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Note: All 12 quizzes for Toronto PPG1007 Strategic Implementation are available at Concept Comprehension Quizzes for PPG1007 Strategic Implementation.

CCQ1007.10.01. Among the statements a-d pertaining to making slide presentations choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. PowerPoint slides often supplement oral presentations, and indeed sometimes replace written reports altogether as nonverbal means of communication.

b. Eugene Bardach’s advice on using PowerPoint slides includes keeping it simple with having each slide present a separate point.

c. Bardach recommends using only two or at most three colours.

d. Bardach believes that visual supplements, such as photographs, can nicely support all the words, provided they are carefully chosen and displayed

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ1007.10.02. Among the statements a-d pertaining to beginning with a grabber choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Because audience members who are interested in your subject will focus on your content there is no particular value in trying to “begin with a bang.”

b. Once the speaker has the attention of the audience, it is useful to quickly establish rapport.

c. Peter Jeff’s pneumonic, TEASE, provides the following five ways to start a speech: Testimonial (citing the behaviour of a celebrity pertinent to X and/or quote an influential person the audience will know of or respect); Evidence (presenting statistics or other data on X); Anecdote (telling a story of someone directly affected by X); Statement (making a bold observation on the importance of X) and Example (citing a person whose career really took off because of X).

d.  Marie Danziger suggests seven possible ways to establish rapport with the audience in the first 60 seconds: Compliment them; Identify with them; Tell them a funny story; Address their immediate concerns, fears, or expectations; Acknowledge some difference or problem between you and them (if appropriate!); Describe an interesting story you just read or experienced – or a movie or TV show you just saw – to introduce your main theme; Share your real-time feelings about the place, the occasion, or events that have just taken place.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ1007.10.03. Among the statements a-d pertaining to ending memorably choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Bookend close: Refer back to your opening anecdote or quote.

b. Callback close: Refer back to a story you told where some activity was not fully completed.

c. Repetitive close: Find a phrase and structure it in a repetitive format that strikes the cadence of a drummer, building to a crescendo ending of a motivational speech.

d. Third party close: Use the premise of a quotation to frame your finale so that it serves as a launching pad to lift your message high for the audience to more fully appreciate.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ1007.10.04. Among the statements a-d pertaining to elevator pitch choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Persuasive speakers should be able to describe yourself, your proposal and its value proposition in 30 to 120 seconds, the time span of an elevator ride.

b. The purpose of the elevator pitch is interest the listener sufficiently to allow you to make the full pitch.

c. An elevator pitch has less utility in a policy-making environment than it does in a business environment.

d. Elements of an elevator pitch can include answers to the following five questions: Who are you? What is your policy area? Why is it important? What is your goal? How will you carry it through? How much and what kind of support do you need to carry it through?

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ1007.10.05. Among the statements a-d pertaining to practicing the presentation choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Practicing a presentation reduces spontaneity and usually reduces the ability to connect with the audience.

b. Most people do not devote a sufficiently high a portion of the total preparation time for a presentation to rehearsing its delivery.

c. Benefits of practicing a presentation include discovering awkward phrases and tongue-twisters that you did not notice when writing and editing.

d. Benefits of practicing a presentation include gauging the timing and reducing nervousness since rehearsing even one time will improve your confidence in your material.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ1007.10.06. Among the statements a-d pertaining to pre-speech warmups choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Exercises before speaking can improve a presentation or speech.

b. Warm up is unnecessary for presentations in a small room or for audiences of less than 6 people.

c. Good speech takes muscle and just as your leg muscles work better if you warm them up before a run, so will your speech muscles work better if you warm them up.

d. Longer warm-ups can include stretching and breathing exercises followed by reading selected word sequences.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ1007.10.07. Among the statements a-d pertaining to body language and posture choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Body language (non-verbal expression) is a powerful form of communication and a speaker’s posture influences not only the listener’s assessment of the speaker, but also the behaviour of the speaker.

b. Never try to “fake it” when adopting a pose that presents you in a more powerful position.

c. Eye contact conveys confidence.

d. Engage with your face.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ1007.10.08. Among the statements a-d pertaining to voice projection and volume choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Projecting one’s voice at the appropriate volume enhances one’s effectiveness as a speaker.

b. Find a volume that everyone can hear and stick to it.

c. Vary the volume throughout because speaking for any length of time at the same volume (whether loud or soft) puts people to sleep.

d. Emphasize target words or phrases by speaking louder or softer (as appropriate) and mirror emotional content with volume changes.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ1007.10.09. Among the statements a-d pertaining to speech pauses choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. If you do pauses right, nobody is conscious of them, but your ideas are communicated more persuasively.

b. If you do pauses wrong, your credibility is weakened, and your audience struggles to comprehend your message.

c. Appropriate lengths for pauses (from a fraction of second to several seconds or more) will vary considerably based on your speaking style, the nature of your message, the duration of your talk, your audience, and cultural norms.

d. Pauses should be used consistently so that, for example, comma pauses (however long they are) should be shorter than paragraph pauses.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ1007.10.10. Among the statements a-d pertaining to eliminating filler words choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Filler words such as um, uh, and you know are natural and add authenticity to presentations.

b. Persuasive speakers avoid using filler words.

c. Repeated and excessive use of fillers weakens your credibility, because it may be perceived as indicating lack of preparation, lack of knowledge, or lack of passion.

d. Fillers are inserted when our brain needs a moment to catch up to our mouth so to avoid fillers, raise your level of preparation, and/or slow your pace to make it easier for your brain to keep up.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified on 2 November 2017.

Image: High School Presentations, at http://learni.st/users/ann.vaseliades/boards/2180-high-school-presentations, accessed 21 January 2016.