Toronto PPG1007 Putting Policy into Action – Strategic Implementation of Public Objectives

… one of the Specimen Courses in Implementation and Delivery

Click for syllabus

Course description

This is a foundational course in policy practice. It is interdisciplinary, drawing on key concepts from economics, politics, other social sciences, business, and public administration, as well as the world of the policy practitioner. [See Top 120 + 80 Concepts for PPG1007.] It introduces you to thinking in a critical, integrated way about how to deliver on public policy objectives in the context of a dynamic political and stakeholder environment. Specifically, it examines key considerations in developing an implementation strategy for a policy initiative.

Faculty

Ian Clark (Section I); Barry Goodwin (Sections III, IV); Janet Mason (Section II)

Notes for PPG1007 Section I

The following live cases with real clients will be used in Section I:

Class mission statement

When completed in early April 2018, the two case links above will house the publicly-accessible student outputs that respond to the class mission “to produce an impressive body of strategic advice on real implementation problems,” specifically:

At the beginning of the course, Section I students were notified that:

  1. The link in the Week column in the table below (e.g., 1) points to the class outline for that week for Section I
  2. Before the first class please complete the tasks noted in Preparation Before First Class for PPG1007 Section I (including 10-question quiz on Blackboard and 3-paragraph email to instructor)
  3. In addition to the required readings noted in the syllabus and listed below, students in Section I are to read the ten Atlas concept pages for that week noted in Top 120 + 80 Concepts for PPG1007 and complete the concept comprehension quiz for that week on Blackboard
  4. Before 31 January, please schedule your February Meeting with Instructor
  5. We will use Breakout Groups for PPG1007 Section I
  6. For deadlines see Schedule for Oral Briefs and Assignments
  7. People willing to help are listed at Resource Persons for First Nation Cases
Week-by-week course outline
Week
PPG1007 Class Topic
Related Atlas Topic
1

10
Jan

Course Overview and Key Themes

(Section I Guests: Rob St. Pierre, MPP2017 and Policy Analyst, INAC and Kristen Young, MPP2018)

The Study of Implementation and Delivery
2

17
Jan

Strategic Management in the Public Sector and the Demand for Effective Implementation Strategic Management in the Public Sector
3

24
Jan

Real Cases of Policy Challenges and Responses

(Plenary Guest: David Szwarc, CAO, Region of Peel)

Writing to Persuade
4

31
Jan

The Political and Fiscal Context – Gaining Legitimacy and Support

(Section I Guests, by phone: Anne ScottonHarry Swain, and Kim Scott)

Securing Legal Authority and Budgetary Resources

Managing Risk

5

7
Feb

The Stakeholder Context – Interests and Perspectives on Change

(Section I Guest: Vass Bednar, Senior Policy Associate, Airbnb)

Interests and the Policy Process

Problem Definition and Agenda Setting

Models of Decision Making

6

14
Feb

Designing the Delivery Model and Improving Performance Designing the Delivery Model

Promoting Innovation and Driving Change

(7a
26
Feb)7
28
Feb
Performance Measurement, Accountability, and Good Governance

(Section I Guest: Anne Scotton, Ontario RDG and Lora Thacker, Jr Economist, Indigenous Affairs Canada)

The Study of Evaluation and Performance Measurement

Organizing and Measuring for Performance

Controlling Fraud, Waste, and Abuse

8

7
Mar

Communicating Policy

(Section I Guest: Rhonda McMichael, ADM Communications, Ontario Cabinet Office)

Consulting and Communicating on Policy
9

14 Mar

Frank and Fearless Advice

(Plenary Guest, Peter Wallace, City Manager of Toronto)

Institutional Dynamics within Government
10

21 Mar

Minister’s Briefing: Implementation Plan

(Section I guests for presentation dry-runs: Anna Strathy, Rob St. Pierre, André Côté, and Lora Thacker)

Speaking to Persuade
11

28 Mar

Minister’s Briefing: Implementation Plan

(Section I guests for role-playing: Anne Scotton, James Mitchell, Andrew Graham, and Lora Thacker)

The Study of Leadership and Communication
12

4
Apr

 

Review, Discussion, Wrap Up, Evaluation, and Preparing for Internship Working in Organizations

Managing Oneself

Briefing Note Assignments (15% + 30% of final mark)

Each student prepares two sequential briefing notes on a topic chosen from a list provided by each sectional instructor. The first note (15%; due 31 January) will require you to develop a background assessment of an assigned implementation challenge. In the second (30%; due 28 February), you will take this further by developing strategic options and a recommended course of action for a decision maker. Each Note will be a maximum of two pages in length and be written in a concise, professional style. Each Note will be assessed on the quality of your research, your analytical and problem-solving skills, your ability to appropriately apply concepts covered in class to date, your creativity and the clarity and focus of your writing.

Minister’s Briefing Assignment (40% of final mark)

Each group prepares and presents a Minister’s Briefing. The group plays the role of a team of senor policy advisors who must prepare and present a briefing to the Minister assessing options and recommending a proposed implementation strategy for a major policy initiative from a list provided by the sectional instructor. It is assumed that the deputy minister, other Cabinet Ministers and senior officials will also attend the briefing.

Given the fiscal context, every policy area must adhere to the spending objectives established for it. In general, any spending on new initiatives must come from existing programs or an alternative financing arrangement. As part of your implementation considerations, please identify any offsets or repurposing of funding, or any new financial arrangements. In organizing your research, analysis and presentation material, please refer to the Minister’s Briefing Guidelines. The Minister’s Briefing Workshop will provide you with hands-on practice in working and presenting as a team on a policy assignment.

Source

By permission of the instructors.

Syllabus link on Atlas

http://www.atlas101.ca/pm/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/PPG-1007-2018-Final-Draft-Syllabus-Nov-16.pdf

Seminar topics and readings

Week 1: Course Overview and Key Themes

Moore, Mark H. Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government. (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1995). Chapter 1, 13-21.

Optional

Graham, Andrew, “Pressman/Wildavsky and Bardach: Implementation in the public sector, past, present and future”, Canadian Public Administration, Vol. 48, No. 2, 2005. pp. 268-273. Book Review.

Pal, Leslie, ‘Problem Definition in Policy Analysis’, in Beyond Policy Analysis (Toronto: Nelson Education, 2014), Chap 3.

Week 2: Strategic Management in the Public Sector and the Demand for Effective Implementation

Moore, Mark H. Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government. (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1995). Chapter 2, 52-56, Chapter 3, 57-77.

Moore, Mark H. Recognizing Public Value. (2013; Cambridge, Harvard University Press) pp. 1-10, plus Figure A.1. in Appendix.

Pal, Leslie, ‘Policy Instruments and Design’, in Beyond Policy Analysis (Toronto: Nelson Education, 2014), Chap. 4, 131-164. Comparative analysis of policy tools; if short of time, focus your reading on pages 129-136 and 150-173.

Optional

Moore, Mark H. Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government. (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1995). All of Chapters 2 and 3, (80 pages: 22-102).

Moore, Mark H. Recognizing Public Value. (2013; Cambridge, Harvard University Press), all of Chapter 1, (52 pages: 19-71).

Dean, Tony, “Is Public Service Delivery Obsolete?” Literary Review of Canada, September 2011, at http://reviewcanada.ca/magazine/2011/09/is-public-service-delivery-obsolete/, accessed 20 November 2017.

Week 3: Real Cases of Policy Challenges and Responses (Plenary with guest David Szwarc, Chief Administrative Officer, Region of Peel)

Readings: Five case examples prepared by our guest speaker will be posted on Blackboard. In preparation, read the cases against the assigned questions outlined in the case material and be ready for discussion in class where you may be cold-called by our guest speaker to present your analysis and recommended course of action.

Week 4: The Political and Fiscal Context – Gaining Legitimacy and Support

Moore, Mark H. Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government. (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1995). Chapter 4, pp 111-119.

<ARTICLES FROM THE PRESS TBD>

Optional 

Moore, Mark H. Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government. (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1995). All of Chapter 4, (19 pages: 105-134).

Week 5: The Stakeholder Context – Interests and Perspectives on Change

Moore, Mark H. Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government. (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1995). Chapter 4, Sections on The Media; Interest Groups, pp 119-125.

<ARTICLES FROM THE PRESS TBD>

Optional

Lenihan, Don. Rescuing Public Policy. (Public Policy Forum, 2012) Chapter 6, “The Principles of Public Engagement”, pp. 119-128.

Week 6: Designing the Delivery Model and Improving Performance

Bardach, Eugene. A Practical Guide for Policy Analysis. (Washington: CQ Press, 2009). Part 1. ‘The Eightfold Path, Step One: Define the Problem’, 1-10 and Appendix B, ‘Things Governments Do’, 141-149.

<ARTICLES FROM THE PRESS TBD>

Optional

‘Delivery Chain’, Cabinet Office Delivery Toolkit, OPS internal document, May 2011. PDF on Blackboard.

Bovens, Mark and Stavros Zouridis, ‘From street-level to system-level bureaucracies:  how information and communication technology is transforming administrative discretion and constitutional control’, in Public Administration Review, 62.2, March/April 2002, 174-181.

Week 7: Performance Measurement, Accountability, and Good Governance

Moore, Mark. Recognizing Public Value. (2013; Cambridge, Harvard University Press) pp. 410-416.

Paul G. Thomas, “Why is Performance-Based Accountability So Popular in Theory and So Difficult in Practice?”, in KPMG Holy Grail or Achievable Quest: International Perspectives on Public Sector Performance Management. 169-187, 2008.

<ARTICLES FROM THE PRESS TBD>

Optional

Moore, Mark. Recognizing Public Value. (2013; Cambridge, Harvard University Press) All of Conclusion (16 pages, 400-416). PDF on Blackboard.

Moore, Mark and Jean Hartley, ‘Innovations in Governance’ in Stephen Osborne, The New Public Governance?  57-69. (Abingdon: Routledge). 2010. Case examples of governance innovations. PDF on Blackboard.

Michael Barber, Paul Kihn, Andy Mofit, February 2011, ‘Deliverology – from Ideas to Implementation”, McKinsey and Company. https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/public-sector/our-insights/deliverology-from-idea-to-implementation.

Rachel Curran, ‘The Trudeau government’s focus on deliverology shouldn’t distract it from building the public service’s policy muscle’, Policy Options, April 27, 2016, at http://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/april-2016/is-deliverology-right-for-canada/, accessed 20 November 2017.

‘Risk Management: A Framework for the Identification, Assessment and Management of Policy Risks’, Barry Goodwin, December 2015. An example of risk management methodology at the level of an organization. PDF on Blackboard.

Week 8: Communicating Policy

Covello, Vincent and Peter Sandman, ‘Risk Communication: Evolution and Revolution’, 2001.

Government of Canada Directive on the Management of Communications (2016) at https://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/pol/doc-eng.aspx?id=30682

<ARTICLES FROM THE PRESS TBD>

Week 9: Frank and Fearless Advice (Plenary with guest Peter Wallace, City Manager, Municipality of Toronto and former Secretary of Cabinet, Government of Ontario)

<ARTICLES FROM THE PRESS TBD>

Optional

Zussman, David, “Governance: the new balance between politicians and public servants in Canada”, Optimum Online, Vol. 38, Issue 4, 2008.

Aucoin, Peter. ‘New Political Governance in Westminster Systems: Impartial Public Administration and Management Performance at Risk’ in Governance, April 2012, Vol. 25, Issue 2, 177-199.

Weeks 10 and 11: Minister’s Briefing – Implementation Plan

Team presentations to an invited guest who will play the role of Minister. Class participation via assigned roles.

Week 12: Review, Discussion, Wrap Up, Evaluation

Moore, Mark H. Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government. (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1995). Conclusion, 295-309, PDF on Blackboard.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified 2 April 2018.