PPG1000 Institutional Analysis Assignment

… the principal assignment in Toronto PPG1000

Description

This page summarizes the Institutional Analysis Assignment and provides selected resources for students, including examples of papers submitted by students in fall, 2016.

Sample student papers (Final Paper and Op-Ed, December 2016)
Nick Dalla Guarda

Proposal for a Provincial-Municipal Infrastructure Funding Partnership Act

How to solve the municipal infrastructure deficit for free

Benjamin Doyle

Regulatory Consistency – Credential Recognition of Foreign Trained Professionals

Relieving the Headache 

Caleb Holden

Re-energizing the Relationship – Why program level changes may provide the best platform for Indigenous participation in Canada’s response to the Paris Climate Agreement

Trudeau’s Climate Deal has the potential to end Indigenous energy poverty

James Langlois

The Contract Faculty Problem

Ontario’s Contract Faculty Problem

Blake Lee-Whiting

A Pragmatic Canadian Pharmacare Program

Sunny Ways, but not for Pharmacare Reform

Eva Quattrini

German Pharmaceutical Policies – an example for Canada

German healthcare to the rescue – what Canada can learn from German pharmaceutical policies

Michael Smolinski

Modernizing Ontario’s Universities – An Analysis of the Feasibility of Implementing a Sector-Wide Work-Integrated Learning Policy

When it Comes to University Governance, Sometimes Less is More

The policy issues

  1. Fulfillment of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change
  2. Establishment of a national pharmacare program
  3. Credential recognition for foreign trained professionals
  4. Modernization of Ontario’s universities
  5. The municipal infrastructure deficit
Selected resources
Climate Change

Margaret Wente (2016), Justin Trudeau – climate denier? 

Mark Jaccard et al (2016), Is Win-Win Possible? Can Canada’s Government Achieve Its Paris Commitment … and Get Re-Elected?

Prime Minister of Canada (2015), Minister of Environment and Climate Change Mandate Letter

Premier of Ontario (2016), September 2016 Mandate letter – Environment and Climate Change, Premier’s instructions to the Minister on priorities

Pharmacare

Pharmacare2020 (2016), The future of drug coverage in Canada

Kyle Duggan, iPolitics (2016), MPs begin study on pharmacare, warned of high drug costs

Council of Canadians (2016), Liberals veto national pharmacare as more Canadians can’t fill their prescriptions

Prime Minister of Canada (2015), Minister of Health Mandate Letter

Premier of Ontario (2016), September 2016 Mandate letter – Health and Long-Term Care, Premier’s instructions to the Minister on priorities

Credential Recognition

Canada (2016), Learn about foreign credential recognition in Canada

Premier of Ontario (2016), September 2014 Mandate letter – Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade, Premier’s instructions to the Minister on priorities

Ontario’s Universities

Wikipedia (2016), Higher education in Ontario

Ontario (2015), University Funding Model Review

Premier of Ontario (2016), September 2016 Mandate letter – Advanced Education and Skills Development, Premier’s instructions to the Minister on priorities

HEQCO (2016), A Canadian first – Assessing core skills in postsecondary students

Kevin Dougherty et al (2016), Does Performance Funding Work?

Municipal Infrastructure

Prime Minister of Canada (2015), Minister of Infrastructure and Communities Mandate Letter

Premier of Ontario (2016), September 2016 Mandate letter – Infrastructure, Premier’s instructions to the Minister on priorities

Association of Municipalities Ontario (2016), AMO’s 2016 Strategic Objectives

Federation of Canadian Municipalities (2016), Infrastructure

The multi-part assignment

The goal of this multi-part assignment is to better appreciate the impact of institutions and governance mechanisms on public policy making.

You will select one governance challenge/policy issue from the list and complete all of the following components: a research outline, a jurisdictional scan, a final paper, and an op-ed.

All assignments should be double-spaced and written in 12-pt font. No title pages are necessary. Simply put your name, student number, and title at the top of the first page.

1. Research Outline (10% of course grade)

A 2-page backgrounder that: (a) identifies your selected topic; (b) summarizes the existing policy landscape, including current policies and/or policy proposals under debate; and (c) clearly identifies the central governance challenge presently facing decision makers.

In addition, include a bibliography of sources consulted to date. You may cite your sources in any standard academic format, as long as you are consistent.

Due: October 19 by 11:59 p.m.

Criteria for Grading:

  • Is the central governance challenge clearly articulated?
  • Does it provide sufficient and accurate background information?
  • Is the research sufficient, based on sources consulted to date?
  • Is it clearly written, concise, easy to read, and free of spelling and grammatical errors?
  • Have the proper formatting requirements been followed?

2. Jurisdictional Scan (25% of course grade)

A 5-page review of how decision makers in other relevant jurisdictions (municipal, state/provincial, and/or national/federal governments) inside or outside Canada have responded to similar governance challenges. All sources should be properly cited in text and listed in your bibliography.

Due: November 23 by 11:59 p.m.

Criteria for Grading:

  • Is it apparent that the scan is informed by careful research?
  • Are the case analogues relevant and justifiable?
  • Is it supported by credible and properly cited sources?
  • Is it clearly written, concise, easy to read, and free of spelling and grammatical errors?
  • Have the proper formatting requirements been followed?

3. Final Paper (30% of course grade)

A 12-page (approx. 3,000 word) essay that incorporates feedback received on previous components and assesses the feasibility of responses to your selected governance challenge given the constraints created by Canada’s political institutions.

The paper should: (a) explain the central governance challenge facing decision makers, drawing on your research outline; (b) briefly review how we arrived at this predicament, commenting on the role of institutions and key historical events; (c) review available alternatives to the status quo, drawing on your jurisdictional scan; and (d) analyze the feasibility or viability of these alternatives given the constraints created by Canada’s governing institutions.

Due: December 19 by 11:59 p.m.

Criteria for Grading:

  • Is the author’s analysis reasonable, coherent, and convincing?
  • Is the analysis supported by credible and properly cited sources?
  • Does the author engage with the appropriate literature, and has instructor feedback from previous work been incorporated?
  • Does the paper flow smoothly and logically?
  • Is the paper free of spelling and grammatical errors, and have the proper formatting requirements been followed?

4. Op-ed (15% of course grade)

A 650-750 word op-ed article that presents your research findings in a compelling and accessible format for a lay audience. Compose your op-ed as if you are submitting to a newspaper with national reach, such as the Globe and Mail, National Post, or Toronto Star.

Consider these tips:

  • Write for the lay reader (avoid jargon and acronyms)
  • Use simple words, short sentences, and short paragraphs
  • Choose a strong title that clearly summarizes your position
  • Grab the reader’s attention in the first sentence
  • Use the first paragraph to state your point and remaining space to back it up
  • Use anecdotes and analogies to make your point as clear as possible to the reader
  • Finish by reinforcing your central message

Due: December 19 by 11:59 p.m.

Criteria for Grading:

  • Is it clearly written, concise, easy to read, and free of spelling and grammatical errors?
  • Does the author summarize the challenge in clear and succinct language?
  • Does the author present a logical, well-reasoned, and sensible position on the issue?
  • Would it provoke a strong reaction from the average reader?
  • Have the proper formatting requirements been followed?

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified on 25 December 2016.