Atlas112M Management of Human, Information, and Technology Resources

… a half-course module within the core Atlas Courses

fmhmitAtlas module syllabus

This six-topic Atlas module syllabus covers the core topics and concepts in the public management subjects of Human Resource Management and Information and Technology Management. It increases students’ competency in managing human resources, information resources, and information technology as part of the execution of public policy.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this course students will have the skills and knowledge to be able to analyze public management problems by appropriately utilizing the theories and principles in the normed topics and concepts noted below.

Normed topics

The topics are normed in having a volume of content capable of being taught in one course-week of instruction – nominally 3 hours of in-class work and 7 hours of outside-class reading.

  1. The Study of HRM in the Public Sector
  2. Evaluating Talent
  3. Workplace Issues and Labour Relations
  4. The Study of IT/IM in the Public Sector
  5. Online Service Delivery
  6. Open Government

Like other normed topics on the Atlas, each of these has a topic description, links to core concepts relevant to the topic, learning outcomes, a reading list drawn from available course syllabi, and a series of assessment questions.

Concepts to be learned listed alphabetically under topics
The Study of HRM in the Public Sector

Appointment

Appointment Framework

Career Development

Coaching

Human Resources Planning

Non-Partisanship

Pay for Performance

Recognition

Seniority

Staffing Strategy

Turnover

Evaluating Talent

Appraisal

Merit System

Qualification Standard

Talent Management

Workplace Issues and Labour Relations

Bargaining Agent

Career Transition

Core Competencies (OECD)

Favouritism

Job Rotation

Neutrality

Paid Sick Leave

Person with Disabilities

Salary

Salary Range

Secondment

Termination

Training

Transition Support Measure

Workplace Flexibility

Workplace Well-Being

The Study of IT/IM in the Public Sector

Context of Information Practices

E-Governance

E-Government

Knowledge Management

Online Service Delivery

Citizen-Centred Service Delivery

Context of Information Practices

E-Governance

E-Government

Innovation Networks

Knowledge Management

Quality Services Initiative

Service Delivery

Service to Citizens

Open Government

Framing of Information

Information Economy

Intellectual Property

 Course syllabi sources

HRM: Indiana (SPEA): V-561; USC (Price): PPD-685; Carleton: PADM-5418; NYU (Wagner): PADM-GP.2135; Rutgers (SPAA): 20:834:523; Georgia: PADP-6920

IT/IM: Carleton: PADM-5472B; Rutgers (SPAA): 20:834:521; USC (Price): PPD-654; Indiana (SPEA): V516;

Recommended readings

NOTE: Readings from open access sources will be developed

Week 1: Managing People: Performance, Recruitment, Renewal

REQUIRED: Pynes, J.E. (2013). Human resources management for public and nonprofit organizations, 4th ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Chapter 1 (Human Resource Management in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors); Chapter 2 (Strategic Human Resource Management and Planning); Chapter 7 (Recruitment and Selection in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors)

Riccucci, Norma, ed. Public personnel management: Current concerns, future challenges. Longman Publishing Group, 2006. Chapter 1 (Public Human Resource Management:  How We Get Where We Are Today) Chapter 2 (Building Public HRM Capacity in Fragile and Transitional States: Linking Theory, Research, Practice and Teaching) & Chapter 11 (Hiring in the Federal Government:  Balancing Technical, Managerial, and Political Imperatives)

OPTIONAL:

Perry, J. L., Mesch, D., & Paarlberg, L. (2006). Motivating employees in a new governance era: The performance paradigm revisited. Public Administration Review, 505-514.

Feldheim, Ann M. (2007). Public sector downsizing and employee trust. International Journal of Public Administration30(3), 249-270.

Fishman, C. (1998, July 31). The war for talent. Retrieved August 2, 2012, from Fast Company: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/16/mckinsey.html

Moynihan, D. & Pandey, S. 2008. “The Ties that Bind: Social Networks, Person-Organization Value Fit, and Turnover Intention.” Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 18(2): 205-227.

Grissom, J. 2012. “Revisiting the Impact of Participative Decision Making on Public Employee Retention: The Moderating Influence of Effective Managers.” The American Review of Public Administrators, 42(4): 400-418.

Jonathan Malloy, “The Next Generation? Recruitment and Renewal in the Federal Public Service,” in G. Bruce Doern (ed.), How Ottawa Spends 2004-2005: Mandate Change in the Paul Martin Era. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2004, 277-295.

Week 2: Evaluating Talent

REQUIRED:

Pynes, J.E. (2013). Human resources management for public and nonprofit organizations, 4th ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Chapter 6 (Job Analysis) & Chapter 8 (Performance Management)

Riccucci, Norma, ed. Public personnel management: Current concerns, future challenges. Longman Publishing Group, 2006. Chapter 14 (Managing Human Resources to Improve Organizational Productivity: The Role of Performance Evaluation) & Chapter 15 (Privatized Prisons and Unions: Personnel Management Implications)

OPTIONAL:

Ryan, K. (2012, January-February). Gilt Groupe’s CEO on Building a Team of a Players. Harvard Business Review, 43-46. [https://hbr.org/2012/01/gilt-groupes-ceo-on-building-a-team-of-a-players]

Isaacson, W. (2012, April). The Real Leadership Lessons of Steve Jobs. Harvard Business Review, 93-102.

Lynes, P., Gold, M., Cordero, V. & Rivera, S. (2012, March). A Successful Practice, City Of Los Angeles: A Competency Model. HR News, 16-19 ß RECRUITING AND SELECTING STAFF

Pfeffer, J., & Veiga, J. F. (1999). Putting people first for organizational success. The Academy of Management Executive13(2), 37-48.

Week 3: Workplace Issues and Labour Relations

REQUIRED:

Pynes, J.E. (2013). Human resources management for public and nonprofit organizations, 4th ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Chapter 10 (Benefits), Chapter 11 (Training and Career Development) & Chapter 12 (Labor-Management Relations)

Riccucci, Norma, ed. Public personnel management: Current concerns, future challenges. Longman Publishing Group, 2006. Chapter 13 (Public Sector Pensions and Benefits: Challenges in a New Environment)

OPTIONAL:

Porath, C., & Pearson, C. (2013). The price of incivility. Harvard business review91(1-2), 115-121.

Drucker, P. F. (2002). They’re not employees, they’re people. Harvard Business Review80(2), 70-7. https://hbr.org/2002/02/theyre-not-employees-theyre-people [WEB]

Gunderson, M. (2002). “Chapter 28: Collective bargaining and dispute resolution in the public sector.” In Dunn, C. J. (Ed.). (2002). The handbook of Canadian public administration. Oxford University Press.

Jameson, J. K. (2001). Employee perceptions of the availability and use of interest‐based, right‐based, and power‐based conflict management strategies. Conflict resolution quarterly19(2), 163-196.

Pfeffer, J. (1998). The human equation: Building profits by putting people first. Harvard Business Press. Pages 64-98.

Week 4: IT in the Public Sector: Costs and Challenges

TEXTBOOK

Reddick, C. (2011). Public administration and information technology. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. Chapter 1 (Chapter 1: Public Administration and Information Technology)

Eggers, W. D. (2007). Government 2.0: Using technology to improve education, cut red tape, reduce gridlock, and enhance democracy. Rowman & Littlefield. Chapter 1 (“MyGov” : building a citizen-centered government) & Chapter 2 (Knocking down walls and building bridges)

RECOMMENDED READINGS

The Economist. 14 February 2008. “Government offline: Why business succeeds on the web and government mostly fails” The Economist. Available at http://www.economist.com/node/10689634

Carrera, Leandro, Patrick Dunleavy & Simon Bastow. 2009. “Understanding productivity trends in UK tax collection” LSE Public Policy Group Working Paper. Available at http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/25532/

Office of the Auditor General of Canada. 2010. “Chapter 1: Aging Information Technology Systems” Report of the Auditor General of Canada to the House of Commons. Ottawa: Government of Canada. Available at http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/docs/parl_oag_201004_01_e.pdf

Reddick, Christopher G. & Michael Turner. 2011. “Channel choice and public service delivery in Canada: Comparing e-government to traditional service delivery.” Government Information Quarterly 29: 1-11.

Dunleavy, Patrick, Helen Margetts, Simon Bastow & Jane Tinkler. 2004. “Government IT Performance and the Power of the IT Industry: A Cross-National Analysis.” Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, 1-5 September. Available at http://www.governmentontheweb.org/sites/governmentontheweb.org/files/Government-IT‐Performance.pdf

Scavo, C., & Shi, Y. (2000). Public administration: The role of information technology in the reinventing government paradigm-normative predicates and practical challenges. Social Science Computer Review, 18, 166-178.

McClure, C. R., & Bertot, J. C. (2000). The chief information officer (CIO): assessing its impact. Government Information Quarterly, 17(1), 7–12.

Week 5: Online Service Delivery

TEXTBOOK

Eggers, W. D. (2007). Government 2.0: Using technology to improve education, cut red tape, reduce gridlock, and enhance democracy. Rowman & Littlefield. Chapter 5 (G2B: the eGov invisible hand), Chapter 6 (The transparent state), Chapter 7 (The electronic advocate: citizenry online).

Reddick, C. (2011). Public administration and information technology. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. Chapter 4 (E-Governance), Chapter 5 (Leadership and Management) & Chapter 6 (E-Government and Organizational Change)

RECOMMENDED READINGS

Brown, David. 2007. “The Government of Canada: Government On-Line and Citizen-Centred Service” in Borins, Sanford et al. Digital State at the Leading Edge. Toronto: Toronto University Press. pp. 37-68.

Reddick, Christopher G. & Michael Turner. 2011. “Channel choice and public service delivery in Canada: Comparing e-government to traditional service delivery.” Government Information Quarterly 29: 1-11.

Karwan, K. R., & Markland, R. E. (2006). Integrating service design principles and information technology to improve delivery and productivity in public sector operations: The case of the South Carolina DMV. Journal of Operations Management, 24(4), 347–362.

Archmann, S., & Iglesias, J. C. (2010). eGovernment – a driving force for innovation and efficiency in Public Administration. Eipascope, (1), 29–36.

Welch, E. W., Hinnant, C. C., & Moon, M. J. (2005). Linking Citizen Satisfaction with E-Government and Trust in Government. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 15(3), 371–391. doi:10.1093/jopart/mui021

Tolbert, C. J., & Mossberger, K. (2006). The Effects of E-Government on Trust and Confidence in Government. Public Administration Review, 66(3), 354–369.

Week 6: Open Government

TEXTBOOK

Eggers, W. D. (2007). Government 2.0: Using technology to improve education, cut red tape, reduce gridlock, and enhance democracy. Rowman & Littlefield. Chapter 9 (Solving privacy & security riddles), Chapter 10 (Cyber Defense) & Chapter 11 (Overcoming hidden hurdles)

Reddick, C. (2011). Public administration and information technology. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. Chapter 8 (E-Procurement, E-Commerce, and Online Financial Reporting), Chapter 9 (Human Resources Information Systems), Chapter 10 (Information Security and Privacy)

RECOMMENDED READINGS

Power of Information Taskforce. 2009. Power of Information Taskforce Report. pp. 21-35. Available at https://ntouk.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/poit-report-final-pdf.pdf

Noveck, Beth Simone. 2009. “Peer‐Patent: A Modest Proposal” and “The Single Point of Failure.” In Wiki Government: How technology can make government better, democracy stronger, and citizens more powerful. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press. Pp. 3-44.

Benkler, Yochai. 2006. “Peer production and sharing”. In The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom. New Haven: Yale University Press. Pp. 59‐90. Available at http://www.benkler.org/Benkler_Wealth_Of_Networks.pdf.

Davies, Tim. 2010. “4. Data” In Open data, democracy and public sector reform: A look at open government data use from data.gov.uk. Available at http://www.opendataimpacts.net/report/ Pp. 22‐35.

Poole, D. (2007). A study of beliefs and behaviors regarding digital technology. New Media & Society, 9(5), 771–793.

McLean, A. (2011). Ethical frontiers of ICT and older users: cultural, pragmatic and ethical issues. Ethics and Information Technology, 13(4), 313–326.

Holzer, M., Manoharan, A., & Van Ryzin, G. (2010). Global Cities on the Web: An Empirical Typology of Municipal Websites. International Public Management Review, 11(3), 104-121.

Jackson, L. A., Zhao, Y., Kolenic, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Harold, R., & Von Eye, A. (2008). Race, Gender, and Information Technology Use: The New Digital Divide. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 11(4), 437–442.

Sample Assessment Questions:

1a) One remaining legacy of the New Public Management reforms of the 1980s is performance-based pay for executives. What are some of the possible advantages and disadvantages of this type of pay structure in terms of attracting and retaining talented leaders? 1b) What is the merit system in the context of human resource management? How is non-partisanship an important dimension of the merit system?

2a) Why is it important for public managers to measure the performance of employees? What are some of the criteria that managers use in evaluating performance? 2b) “Pay for Performance” systems provide financial incentives to employees for successful performance reviews. What are some of the possible advantages and disadvantages of these systems?

3a) What is essential services legislation? Why do governments make use of this type of legislation, and what are some of the potential advantages and disadvantages associated with its use? 3b) What is collective bargaining? Why is this an important concept for public sector managers to understand?

4a) Explain, with examples, why many scholars and working professionals in the field of public management view successful integration of IT as a significant potential source of savings and efficiency gains? 4b) What are some possible sources of project failure that can interfere with efforts to successfully integrate new IT into government operations? Please use examples to illustrate your point.

5a) What are some of the potential benefits to governments and citizens associated with increased online service delivery of public services? Please discuss in a short (2-3 page) paper, with examples. 5b) What are some potential complications from attempts to expand online service delivery that can lead to undesirable unintended consequences?

6a) In advanced democracies, the ongoing trend is towards more “open government” with more information being made accessible to media and the citizenry. Under what circumstances is government justified in resisting this trend, and restricting the amount of information that it makes publicly available? 6b) What is crowd-sourcing? How can crowd-sourcing potentially improve government performance and decision making? 6c) What is crowd-sourcing? How can crowd-sourcing potentially improve government performance and decision making?

Page created by: James Ban on 23 July 2015 and edited for the new Atlas by Ian Clark, last updated on 16 June 2016.

Image: PMC, at http://www.pmcoaching.com/, accessed 11 March 2016.