Occupational Ghettoization

… a core concept in Socioeconomic and Political Context and Atlas105

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Concept description

David Pettinicchio (reference below) defines occupational ghettoization as “the segregation or clustering of people with disabilities into certain low-wage occupations.”

Describing the findings in a paper with Michelle Maroto (reference below), Pettinicchio writes:

“We found that people with disabilities are generally segregated into certain occupations, but this varies by type of disability. As the table shows, people with cognitive disabilities tend to experience the highest levels of segregation. The table also illustrates that people with different disabilities experience different levels of isolation suggesting that they may be “tokens” in their workplace. Because segregation limits employer interactions with people with disabilities, tokenism and isolation may also propagate some of the negative attitudes and stereotypes held by employers when it comes to disability and work.

“In terms of segregation across specific disabilities, we found that people with physical disabilities were overrepresented in administrative support and people with cognitive disabilities were overrepresented in food preparation and service occupations. This overrepresentation in certain occupations also had important consequences for earnings. Overall, people with disabilities were underrepresented in higher-earning occupations that include management, business, science, and the arts, and were overrepresented in low-earning, low-skill jobs with few requirements. Importantly though, not only are individuals with disabilities segregated in low earning occupations, they also earn less within those occupations than individuals without disabilities.”

Atlas topic, subject, and course

Income Inequality and Poverty (core topic) in Socioeconomic and Political Context and Atlas105.

Sources

David Pettinicchio (2014), openpop.org, Occupational Segregation and Persistent Labor Market Inequality Among People with Disabilities, 3 October 2014, at http://www.openpop.org/?p=913, accessed 18 December 2018.

Michelle Michelle and David Pettinicchio (2014), Disability, structural inequality, and work: The influence of occupational segregation on earnings for people with different disabilities,Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 38:76-92 at http://www.davidpettinicchio.com/uploads/1/5/4/8/15484818/disability_structural_inequality_and_work.pdf, accessed 18 December 2018.

Page created by: Alec Wreford and Ian Clark, last modified on 18 December 2018.

Image: David Pettinicchio (2014), openpop.org, Occupational Segregation and Persistent Labor Market Inequality Among People with Disabilities, 3 October 2014, at http://www.openpop.org/?p=913, accessed 18 December 2018.