Colonialism

… a core concept in Governance and Institutions and Atlas100

colonialismConcept description

Writing in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Margaret Kohn (reference below) defines colonialism as a broad concept that refers to the project of European political domination from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries that ended with the national liberation movements of the 1960s.

Kohn writes:

“Colonialism is a practice of domination, which involves the subjugation of one people to another. One of the difficulties in defining colonialism is that it is hard to distinguish it from imperialism. Frequently the two concepts are treated as synonyms. Like colonialism, imperialism also involves political and economic control over a dependent territory. The etymology of the two terms, however, provides some clues about how they differ. The term colony comes from the Latin word colonus, meaning farmer. This root reminds us that the practice of colonialism usually involved the transfer of population to a new territory, where the arrivals lived as permanent settlers while maintaining political allegiance to their country of origin. Imperialism, on the other hand, comes from the Latin term imperium, meaning to command. Thus, the term imperialism draws attention to the way that one country exercises power over another, whether through settlement, sovereignty, or indirect mechanisms of control.

“The legitimacy of colonialism has been a longstanding concern for political and moral philosophers in the Western tradition. At least since the Crusades and the conquest of the Americas, political theorists have struggled with the difficulty of reconciling ideas about justice and natural law with the practice of European sovereignty over non-Western peoples. In the nineteenth century, the tension between liberal thought and colonial practice became particularly acute, as dominion of Europe over the rest of the world reached its zenith. Ironically, in the same period when most political philosophers began to defend the principles of universalism and equality, the same individuals still defended the legitimacy of colonialism and imperialism. One way of reconciling those apparently opposed principles was the argument known as the “civilizing mission,” which suggested that a temporary period of political dependence or tutelage was necessary in order for “uncivilized” societies to advance to the point where they were capable of sustaining liberal institutions and self-government.”

Source

Margaret Kohn (2012), Colonialism, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, at http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/colonialism/#Def, accessed 2 October 2016.

Topic, subject and Atlas course

Diversity, Identity, and Rights in Governance and Institutions and Atlas100.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified 26 December 2016.

Image: Snippits and Slappits, at http://snippits-and-slappits.blogspot.ca/2011/10/neo-colonialism-subversion-in-africa, accessed 2 October 2016.