Brooks’ Axes for Party Realignment – Individual-Social and Closed-Open

… a core term in Governance and Institutions and Atlas100

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In his New York Times article (reference below and link on right) just after the 2016 American election, David Brooks suggests that parties could realign around two axes – individual-social and closed-open – and calls for a new party in the social and open quadrant.

Brooks writes:

“I suspect the coming political movements will be identified on two axes: open and closed and individual and social.

“Those who believe in open trade, relatively open immigration, an active foreign policy and racial integration. Those who believe in closed believe in protective trade, closed borders, a withdrawn foreign policy and ethnic separatism.

“Those who favor individual believe in individual initiative, designing programs to incentivize enterprise and removing regulatory barriers. Those who believe in social believe that social mobility happens within rich communities – that people can undertake daring adventures when they have a secure social and emotional base.

“Donald Trump is probably going to make the G.O.P. the party of individual/closed. He’s going to start with the traditional Republican agenda of getting government out of the way, and he’s going to add walls, protectionism and xenophobia. That will leave people isolated in the face of the challenges of the information age economy, and it will close off the dynamism and diversity that always marked this crossroads of the nation.

“The Democrats are probably going to be the party of social/closed. The coming Sanders-Warren party will advocate proposals that help communities with early education programs and the like, but that party will close off trade, withdraw from the world, close off integration with hyper-race-conscious categories and close off debate with political correctness.

“Which is why I’ve been thinking we need a third party that is social/open. This compassionate globalist party would support the free trade and skilled immigration that fuel growth. But it would also flood the zone for those challenged in the high-skill global economy – offering programs to rebuild community, foster economic security and boost mobility. It would integrate the white working class and minority groups by emphasizing that we are all part of a single American idea.”

Brooks’ propositions as a two-by-two table

CLOSED

(protective trade, closed borders, withdrawn foreign policy, ethnic separatism)

OPEN

(open trade, relatively open immigration, active foreign policy, racial integration)

INDIVIDUAL

(individual initiative, incentivise enterprise, remove regulatory barriers)

Republican/Trump

– Getting government out of the way
– Walls
– Protectionism
– Xenophobia

 

 

SOCIAL

(mobility happens within rich communities)

Democrat/Sanders-Warren

– Help communities with programs like early education but close off trade
– Withdraw from the world
– Close off integration with hyper-race-conscious categories
– Close off debate with political correctness

New Party
(Compassionate globalist)

– Support the free trade and skilled immigration that fuel growth
– Help those challenged in the high-skill global economy by offering programs to rebuild community, foster economic security and boost mobility
– Integrate the white working class and minority groups by emphasizing that we are all part of a single American idea

Brooks’ call to action

David Brooks ends his column with:

“Trump’s bigotry, dishonesty and promise-breaking will have to be denounced. We can’t go morally numb. But he needs to be replaced with a program that addresses the problems that fueled his ascent.

“After all, the guy will probably resign or be impeached within a year. The future is closer than you think.”

Atlas topic, subject, and course

Diversity, Identity, and Rights (core topic) in Governance and Institutions and Atlas100 Governance and Institutions.

Source

David Brooks (2016), The View From Trump Tower, New York Times, 11 November 2016, http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/12/opinion/the-view-from-trump-tower.html, accessed 13 November 2016.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified on 13 November 2016.

Images: David Brooks (2016), The View From Trump Tower, New York Times, 11 November 2016, http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/12/opinion/the-view-from-trump-tower.html, accessed 13 November 2016.