ANU Crawford Learning Outcomes

ANULOsLearning outcomes, indicative assessments and workload estimates from ANU Crawford courses

The material in the table below was copied with minimal editing from the ANU Crawford course descriptions at http://programsandcourses.anu.edu.au/2015/program/MPUBP and http://programsandcourses.anu.edu.au/2015/program/MPUAD (accessed 5 May 2015). The course names are live linked to the course descriptions on the ANU Crawford website.

Learning Outcome for MPP Program (at http://programsandcourses.anu.edu.au/2015/program/MPUBP)

Upon successful completion, students will have the skills and knowledge to:

1. Demonstrate deep knowledge and understanding of key debates and thinking in the field of public policy, in Australia and globally

2. Reflect critically on and engage in key theoretical debates in the field of public policy

3. Engage influentially in debates and analysis of public policy issues and practical challenges across cultural, developmental and institutional contexts

4. Demonstrate knowledge of research principles and both qualitative and quantitative methodologies relevant to the field of public policy

5. Identify and apply appropriate research methods to public policy challenges

6. Analyse, synthesise and communicate complex, political and institutional policy problems from multiple perspectives

7. Develop innovative policy recommendations to complex problems in changing policy environments

8. Understand challenges relating to management, implementation and evaluation of public policies and respond to these in innovative ways.

 

Learning Outcome for MPA Program (at http://programsandcourses.anu.edu.au/2015/program/MPUAD)

Upon successful completion, students will have the skills and knowledge to:

1. Demonstrate understanding of historical, comparative and theoretical perspectives on public sector management and leadership

2. Demonstrate deep knowledge and understanding of key debates and thinking in the field of public sector management and leadership, in Australia and globally

3. Reflect critically on and engage in key theoretical debates in the field of public sector management and leadership

4. Demonstrate knowledge of research principles and both qualitative and quantitative methodologies relevant to the field of public sector management and leadership

5. Apply conceptual analysis and evidence to investigate, analyse and synthesise complex management, leadership and policy challenges from multiple perspectives

6. Apply self-management, communication, influencing and teamwork skills to complex management and leadership challenges.

 

Course (with link)
Learning Outcomes
Indicative Assessment
Workload
POGO6900 Graduate Preparatory Economic, Social and Political Analysis (0.5R for MPP and MPA) Upon completion of the graduate preparatory course students should be able to:

1. be familiar with the fundamental concepts and tools used to analyse economic issues;

2. identify the logic and assumptions underlying the economic way of thinking;

3. develop the written and oral skills required to present an argument based on economic reasoning;

4. examine your own experiences and interactions from an economic perspective;

5. be familiar with the leading analytical frameworks in the study of governance and institutions;

6. develop an understanding of the different types of democratic systems;

7. be familiar with key terms, concepts and ideas in the study of public policy; and

8. identify the key concepts, ideas, theories and terminology associated with social policy.

A range of formative and summative assessment tasks will be used to aid student learning. Feedback will be provided on all tasks. Completion of all tasks is required. Approximately 30 hours class, with an equivalent number of hours in self study
CRWF6900 Graduate Academic and Research Skills for Public Policy (0.5R for MPP and MPA) On completion of the Academic and Research Skills component of this course, students will be able to

1. understand the university’s expectations

2. use strategies to manage time and assignments

3. use strategies to effectively read and understand an academic text

4. use effective strategies to note take, paraphrase and summarise key ideas in an academic text

5. identify an argument and evidence in an academic text

6. construct an argument and provide evidence to support this

7. assess the strengths and weaknesses of another writer’s ideas

8. find, evaluate and interpret authoritative and relevant sources for assignments

9. apply the referencing conventions required by the Crawford School and avoid plagiarism

10. write and structure an assignment in an appropriate style

11. be familiar with the study of Public Policy

12. submit an assignment through Wattle/TurnitinInformation Literacy Program

 

On completion of the Information Literacy Program in this course, students will be able to:

1. use strategies to effectively search for academic text

2. assess the strength and weaknesses of websites

3. assess information sources from Library databases and apply to research requirements

4. understand how to save and organise electronic files

5. use professional design techniques in presentations

6. install online software through Microsoft Office 365 Online Portal

7. apply correct academic formatting for long documents

A range of formative and summative assessment tasks will be used to aid student learning. Feedback will be provided on all tasks. Completion of all tasks is required. Approximately 30 hours class, with an equivalent number of hours in self study
CRWF8000 Government, Markets and Global Change (R for MPP and MPA) On successful completion of the course students will have:

•Developed disciplinary and cross-disciplinary understanding of major challenges facing policymakers;

•Understood key analytic frameworks, techniques and insights from economics, environmental management, and political science; and

•Worked effectively in multidisciplinary teams to analyse major policy problems

Students must complete three (3) case study papers – one per workshop. These papers provide a link between theory and practice allowing students to demonstrate not only an understanding of key frameworks, techniques and insights, and key challenges facing policy makers, but also how they might go about addressing them. Each paper is worth one-third of the overall grade for this course. Students will have a 3 hour lecture per week and three 2 hour case workshops throughout the semester.  Students should expect to spend 10 hours per week related to the course (including class time)
POGO8055 Case Studies in Decision Making (3R/13) Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. applying relevant public policy theory to public sector decision making;

2. devising alternative courses of action, based on conceptual understanding and professional expertise, to address a range of dilemmas facing public sector decision makers;

3.  identifying relevant decision making criteria;

4.  choosing between different courses of action using relevant criteria; and

5. providing a convincing rationale for suggested proposals.

Assessment is comprised of two 1500 word responses to set case studies (30% each) and one 2500 final project (40%) which draws on the students practical experience. Class contact time: Five days 9.00AM-4.00PM
POGO8102 Selected Themes in Public Policy N/A N/A N/A
POGO8210 Case Studies in Economic Policy N/A N/A N/A
POGO8035 Research Project On successful completion of this course, you will understand:

1. the key elements of research in policy and governance, with a keen appreciation of how research and analysis of important issues can inform policy debates and deliberations;

2. the importance of integrating relevant theory and practice through the development of appropriate analytical frameworks to guide and inform empirical studies;

3. the importance of systematically researched, evidence-based policy development, implementation and evaluation in governance; and

4. the way in which the above understandings apply to the policy and governance context addressed by your specific study.

Your understanding will facilitate the development of the following abilities:

Acquisition – an ability to assemble, analyse and adopt policy relevant evidence, and to learn from policy and administrative experience, in a significant governance context.

Application – an ability to use social science methodology, policy analysis techniques, relevant policy instruments, and modern management strategies to address policy problems, to meet policy and administrative challenges, and to deliver public services.

Creativity – an ability to think and act strategically and proactively in the innovative design and achievement of policy and administrative objectives in the present and for the future.

Knowledge base – an ability to develop a comprehensive, meaningful and critical appreciation of how concepts, models and theories assist in making sense of policy and governance.

Communication – an ability to communicate effectively using relevant means, strategies, skills and information of significance to policy and governance.

Assessment is based on the satisfactory completion of a 10,000 word research paper. Students must also meet a number of milestones during the semester including the submission of a 500-word project proposal and a presentation of findings at the end of semester There are approximately 12 contact hours for group sessions and academic skills workshops plus time spent with individual supervisors. Because this is a research project, students will spend most time working independently. The workload is potentially higher than for a normal 6 point subject.
POGO8062 Public Sector Management (R for MPP and MPA) After successfully completing this course you will be able to clearly and confidently:

1. understand the key concepts, ideas, theories and terminology associated with public sector management;

2. identify contemporary management issues, dilemmas and problems in both specific national contexts and across the world;

3. identify practical reforms and apply complex theories to actual scenarios;

4. conduct independent research after careful assessment of the academic worth of sources;

5. analyse resources with a critical awareness of bias and conflicting perspectives;

6. contribute to academic debate and discussion with peers;

7. question and comment on peers’ work;

8. use information technology to work efficiently and to locate academic resources.

 

Class Activities involve active participation in small group discussion with verbal contributions throughout the semester in tutorials (10%), and in online activities with written contributions in laboratories and during non-contact hours (20%).

 

Students will be assessed based on: how successfully they integrate material from the readings in non-familiar situations; how successfully they support, develop and refine their opinions with academic evidence; and how they consider and respond to the contributions of others. The Case Study should be written in the form of a mini-essay (1,000 words), which outlines a contemporary public sector management issue, dilemma or problem. Students will be assessed based on: their selection of an appropriate case; the clear identification of the most relevant management issues; the use of academically appropriate references from credible sources; and the clarity of expression.

 

The Reform Proposal should be written in the form of a major essay (2,500 words), with the aim of persuading a government that it needs to implement a particular reform and that is it achievable. Students will be assessed based on: the selection of appropriate reforms; how they respond to the questions and comments of their peers; the level of critical analysis; the structure; the use of academically appropriate references from credible sources; and the clarity of expression. Detailed criteria and ‘How to’ sheets will be distributed in the labs/tutorials.

10 X I hour lectures and 10 X 2 hour tutorials plus approximately 10 -15 days of work throughout the semester to write the case study and reform proposal-
POGO8090 Making and Evaluating Policy (R/2 fo MPP, R for MPA) On successful completion students will be able to:

1.demonstrate a working knowledge of key terms, concepts and ideas in the study of public policy

2.understand and critically engage with relevant literature on public policy

3.reflect on debates in public policy by drawing connections between theory and practice

4.contribute to informed discussions on the politics and practices of making, implementing and evaluating public policy

5.demonstrate an understanding of the methodological and political aspects of policy evaluation

6.demonstrate the ability to think independently, develop informed perspectives and persuasively communicate in the field of public policy.

Assessment Length Mode of Submission Wt Learning Outcomes
Reading Responses 250 words each In the tutorial 5%

5%

5%

5%

1,2,3,4,6
Paper

 

A. Paper Outline

 

B. Written Paper

 

 

250 words

 

 

1800 words

 

 

In the tutorial

 

 

Assignment box

 

 

10%

 

 

40%

 

 

1,2,3,6

 

 

1,2,3,6

Evaluation Scenario Exam 60 minutes In the lecture

(under exam conditions)

30% 3,5,6
Weekly lectures and tutorials
POGO8032 Comparative Public Sector Management (R for MPA) Demonstrated ability to analyse and evaluate aspects of public management and administration in a comparative context;

demonstrated ability to participate constructively in class discussion of issues relating to public management;

demonstrated ability to develop a detailed proposal for reform of a particular public institution or process

Three brief written assignments on set readings (50%)  and a final essay on a report proposal (50%) A two-hour class will be held weekly for 13 weeks.
POGO8056 People and Performance in Public Organisations (3R/13 for MPA) At the end of this course, students who participate actively in the course should be able to:

•Apply a sound process of reasoning and judgment to a range of critical people management tasks

•Understand and apply ‘organisational behavior’ and ‘performance’ concepts in different public organisational contexts.

•Critically evaluate the likely effectiveness of different approaches to the management of individual performance in context.

•More effectively communicate to increase learning, trust, respect and motivation, particularly in ‘difficult’ situations.

•Apply people management theories and concepts to their own people management challenges including motivating people.

•Apply people management theories and concepts to their own self- management challenges.

•50 % Critical conceptual Essay

•50% Personal Leadership Dilemma

The course is delivered in intensive mode, in three sessions of two days each
POGO8083 Policy Advocacy (3R/13 for MPA) Contribute to practical small-group exercises in policy advocacy

Discuss and debate the value of core readings in policy advocacy

Demonstrate analytical examination of core concepts in the field of policy advocacy

Demonstrate critical analysis of one or more selected case studies in policy advocacy

Reflect on and communicate professional and personal lessons gained in the course

Three written assignments, due at successive points over the semester. A Theory Paper of 2000 words worth 40% of the course grade: students select two or more core concepts from the Brick of readings and compare strengths and weaknesses of each concept. A Practice Paper of 2000 words worth 40% of the course grade: students apply their own choice of core concepts to their own choice of one or more case studies of real-life policy advocacy, with the aim of explaining what distinguishes effective from ineffective advocacy. A Reflective Paper of 1000 words worth 20% of the course grade: students examine their own learning outcomes from the course, taking note of the advocacy exercises, the classroom discussions and their written assignments. 30 contact hours in the lecture room. Voluntary one hour tutorials are offered each week. Students can expect to spend another three hours reading and studying the Brick each week
POGO8101 Policy Process and Analysis Appraise and defend policy typologies and clarify the problem of competing values in defining “good” policies or outcomes;

2.Differentiate and evaluate policy-making models and appraise how policy outcomes are achieved under the different models.

3.Evaluate and recommend how stakeholders may develop “bargaining chips” in the areas of technical, economic, political, or administrative in order to pursue interests and policies;

4.Develop and create a new policy typology that engages multiple stakeholders towards “good” policies or outcomes;

5.Develop and create a new policy-making model that engages multiple stakeholders towards “good” policies or outcomes;

6.Evaluate and recommend experiential research-led learning associated with developing, explaining, and recommending policy typologies and policy-making models.

1. Research-led paper on a policy area (eg., health, women’s participation, education) that differentiates and distinguishes subject content (30%) (1200-1500 words)

2. Experiential learning through role-play (10%) and paper (40%) on how to advance a policy interest through to adoption based on interaction with different stakeholders  (total 50%)  (3000-3750 words)

3. Final examination (20%)

5 hours equivalent
POGO8016 The Economic Way of Thinking 1 (R/2 for MPP, R for MPA) On successful completion of this unit you will be able to:

•Demonstrate a solid understanding of “the economic way of thinking”.

•Demonstrate a solid understanding of the principles of supply and demand, including consumer and firm behaviour.

•Demonstrate a solid understanding of market structure, performance and failure.

•Be able to explain the effects of different government interventions in markets.

•Present in written form arguments using both economic reasoning and actual evidence.

1. Examinable Tutorial Tests (10%)

2. Short Essay (25%)

3. Mid-Semester Exam (25% – redeemable)

4. Final Exam – (40% or 65%)

The course will be delivered over 13 weeks, involving a 2-hour lecture and a 1.5-hour tutorial each week. Students will also be expected to spend a minimum of six hours per week reading the textbook, revising lecture notes and preparing for tutorials.
POGO8019 The Economic Way of Thinking 2 (R for MPP and MPA) On successful completion of this unit you will be able to:

• Demonstrate a sound understanding of the issues of macroeconomics — long run economic growth, unemployment, inflation, and government and international deficits

•Demonstrate a solid understanding of the economic relationships between households, firms and the governments

•Demonstrate skills in measuring GDP, unemployment and inflation, and using these indicators to analyze macroeconomic performance

•Demonstrate a solid understanding of the aggregate demand and aggregate supply framework

•Demonstrate a sound understanding of fiscal policy and monetary policy

•Demonstrate a strong ability to identify macroeconomic issues and apply fiscal and monetary policy instruments to tackle these issues

The assessment of the course has three parts:

•Four assignments (20%)

•Mid-semester exam (30%)

•Final exam (50%)

This course will be delivered over 13 weeks, involving a 2-hour lecture and a 1.5-hour tutorial each week. Students also need to spend a minimum of 7 hours per week to read textbook, lecture notes, write assignments, and do online exercises.
POGO8081 Economics for Government (R/2 for MPP, 3R/13 for MPA) On successful completion of this course, students will be able to

• Understand the tools and insights that economists bring to the study of human activity, the economy and public policy

• Use basic economic analysis in their work as policy administrators and policy makers

• Draw insight from the economic literature and the work of economists  when called for in public administration and policy-making

• Appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of the discipline of economics

Weekly tutorial exercises and study questions, assignments and mid-semester and final examinations. N/A
POGO8096 Research Methods (R for MPP and MPA) On satisfying the requirements of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

 

• define and explain a variety of approaches to research in social sciences (L1);

• demonstrate a basic knowledge of commonly used methodological tools in empirical research, including surveys, interviews, content analysis, case selection and comparison, and basic statistical methods (L2);

• appraise strengths and weaknesses of existing methodological approaches, including: assess conditions under which one can properly apply tools of measurement and systematic ways  to make inferences and interpret data (L3); and

• formulate research questions, develop arguments and choose proper research design in its support (L4)

60% Short notes (Learning outcomes #1 – #6).

40% In-class test (Learning outcomes #1 – #5).

Weekly lectures (2.5 hours x 13 weeks).

3-5 hours per week for reading and preparation outside of contact hours to complete the course

POGO8023 Empirical Political Analysis 1: Public Opinion N/A Literature review (40%), final paper (50%), participation and discussions (10%) 30 hours of weekly seminars
IDEC8088 Applied Economics: Cost/Benefit Analysis On successful completion of this course, students will have:

•a solid understanding of the basic rationale and techniques for applying cost-benefit analysis to government-sponsored programs, policies and projects.

•the ability to plan and implement a cost-benefit study;

•the ability to understand and critique a cost-benefit study prepared by someone else.

•Mid-term Exam – 1.5 hours – 40%

•Individual assignment – maximum 5,000 words, 18 pages – 55%

•Lecture summary – one page maximum – 5%

The IDEC 8088 course involves attendance at a weekly lecture of three hours (including a half hour break), plus a weekly tutorial of one hour.
POGO8111 Public Sector Leadership (R for MPA) Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. understand the nature and significance of models and theories of organisations and organisational leadership in government and governance;

2. use the models and theories as analytical lens for guiding and informing an analysis of organisational structures and dynamics;

3. appreciate the complexities and dilemmas of organisations and organisational leadership in various governance arenas; and

4. address ways in which organisations and organisational leadership could be transformed in a particular governance arena.

Two individual organisational analysis responses (each 1,500 words), and one group project on organisations and organisational leadership (3,500-4,000 words) Six workshops: 9.00am-4.00pm and associated reading, research and writing
POGO8012 Governance and Institutions (R for MPP and MPA) On successful completion of this course students will have:

1. demonstrated a critical understanding of the leading analytical frameworks in the study of governance and institutions;

2. analysed the relative advantages and disadvantages of different types of democratic systems;

3. developed the aptitude to make convincing recommendations of the most appropriate democratic institutions and governance structures for the achievement of policy goals;

4. demonstrated the capacity to research and critically analyse the different democratic systems;

5. demonstrated the ability to think independently, and persuasively communicate ideas in governance and institutions;

6. practised professional skills to i) work effectively in a group; ii) present clearly and concisely; and iii) facilitate the learning of others.

Reflective paper (10%), Major essay (40%), Oral presentation and seminar paper (25%) Examination (25%) Contact hours are 30 in total, divided between lectures and seminars) Students are expect to spend approximately 60 additional hours on readings and assignments to complete the course.
POGO8082 Political Institutions and Policy Processes (R/2 for MPP, 3R/13 for MPA) On successful completion of this course you will have:

•demonstrated a working knowledge of key terms, concepts and ideas in the study of public policy

•considered the major political institutions and actors involved in the public policy process

•debated the role of values in public policy

•examined how public policy issues come onto the agenda, and how they are managed

•demonstrated a working knowledge of policy instruments and their behavioural assumptions

•contributed to informed discussions on various theoretical and practical aspects of public policy;

•demonstrated the capacity to research and critically analyse public policy issues;

•considered the implications of centralised and federal systems of government for public policy

•reflected on the politics and practices of implementing and evaluating public policy

•demonstrated the ability to think independently, and persuasively communicate in the field of public policy.

•Online discussion (30%)

•Policy Project (50%)

•Policy responses (under test conditions) (20%)

Passing the course is conditional on passing all items of assessment

30 contact hours.

At least 30 hours outside of contact hours to complete the course.

POGO8088 New models for governance: strategy, innovation, decentralisation On successful completion of this course, you will

1.Have a crisp grasp of political and policy system structures, systems, processes and dynamics

2.Understand present fractures, fault lines and competing agendas

3.Have explored the detail of possible frameworks covering place based governance, innovation and continuous improvement

4.Have developed skills in change management

5.Have built strategic skills covering policy analysis and assessment.

Assessment                            Word       Ass     Learning outcome Task                                           Count  Value      to be assessed

 

Preparation of                           750×3      30              1, 2, 3 3 mini assignments

 

Preparation of outline             750            20              4, 5   of term paper

 

Final paper                             2500-3000    50             4, 5

 

N/A
POGO8021 Public Sector Ethics (3R/13 for MPA) 1.   critically understand the main concepts and theories in public sector ethics;

2.   critically apply ethical concepts and theories to examples of public sector practice;

3.   access relevant source materials on public sector ethics;

4.    critically understand the role of ethics in professional public sector practice;

5.  apply critical analytical capacity to answering questions on public sector ethics.

Three brief seminar assignments (50%); final essay (50%) 2.5 hours each week
POGO8076 Corruption and Anti-corruption (3R/13 for MPA) An understanding of theories about the causes of corruption

An ability to apply those theories to anti-corruption practice

An ability to identify the theories implicit in anti-corruption practice

An ability to evaluate various forms of anti corruption activity

Two assignments, one to be completed before the face-to-face teaching, one to be completed after. 6 full days of face to face teaching in Canberra preceded by completion of first assignment and followed by completion of second assignment
POGO8024 Social Policy, Society and Change (R for MPP and MPA) N/A Essay 50%, In-class quiz 20%, Tutorial assignments 30% N/A
POGO8050 Empirical Political Analysis 2: Political Economy Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

•demonstrate a broad understanding of key theories and empirical findings in the literature of political economy;

•consider political aspects of real-world economic problems and policies and economic aspects of real-world political conflicts, behavior and outcomes;

•make critical evaluations of methodological issues and problems in existing studies;

•demonstrate a basic knowledge of commonly used methodological tools in studies of political economy, including randomized experiments, multiple regressions, and comparative case studies;

•develop, refine and present a research proposal for their own original research.

40% Literature reviews (Learning outcomes #1 – #4).

 

50% A research proposal (Learning outcomes #5)

 

10% Discussions (Learning outcomes #1 – #5)

Weekly lectures (2.5 hours x 13 weeks)

 

3-5 hours per week for reading and preparation outside of contact hours to complete the course

POGO8001 International Dimensions of Public Administration (3R/13 for MPA) N/A N/A N/A
EURO8003 The European Union: regional integrations in comparative perspective N/A A 1000 word briefing paper (30%) and 4000 word research essay (70%). The program is comprised of lectures, seminars, and structured discussion groups and will offer students exposure to a range of leading researchers, policy practitioners and diplomats. In addition students will work in syndicates and be required to participate in a group presentation on the final day of the course.
POGO8057 Managing Government Finances (3R/13 for MPA) On completion of the course, students will be able:

1.To have a clear understanding of the framework of the Australian governmental system and its impacts on the roles and responsibilities of managers of public resources;

2.To extrapolate their understanding of the Australian public financial management environment to other governmental systems;

3.To explain the methods and roles of, and interactions between, the broad systems applicable in the Australian governmental system relating to budgeting, financial management, accounting and audit;

4.To understand the drivers, successes and failures of public financial management reform;

5.To understand the two-way interaction between governance structures and operational practice;

6.To evaluate the effectiveness of forms of performance management in contemporary government systems; and

 

7.To question and critique the effectiveness of the financial managerial setting operating within Australian governments or governments in their own countries.

 

Assessment for the course consists of two written assignments, a short one to be written after the first three-day session and a long one due two weeks after the completion of the course.    The short assignment will be 2000 words in length and worth 40% of the course assessment.  The long assignment will be 3000 words in length and worth 60% of the course assessment.

 

The short assignment will be based only on material presented and discussed during the first three days.  In the long assignment, all course material will be relevant to the coverage expected of assignments.

 

Both assignments will involve a choice of topics that will be provided to students on the first day of each segment of the course.

 

In both assignments, students will be expected to present critical arguments relating to the theoretical and institutional setting influencing the management of government finances.

Class contact is for 30 hours over six days. Classes are held in two three-day sessions about three weeks apart. Students are expected to read the material supplied in the brick and, desirably, additional material provided for the course on the Wattle website. Essential reading and essay writing are the only obligations on outside-class time.
POGO8080 Organisational Finance and Budgeting On completion of the course, students will be able:

1. To have an understanding of the terminology and concepts in financial reporting and budgeting of both public and private sector entities;

2. To effectively review and evaluate financial information provided in published financial statements;

3. To explain the methods of certain accounting policy choices;

4. To be able to distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information in key financial decision-making;

5. To understand the fundamentals of nature of costs within entities;

6. To understand the basics of an entity’s budgeting process and budget outcomes

Quiz 20%, Assignments 80% N/A
LAWS8034 Law and Regulation (3R/13 for MPA) A participant who has successfully completed this course should:

1.Be familiar with a range of classic and ongoing theories and academic debates on law and regulation, and the concepts and problems addressed in these

2.Be able to reflect on the development of past and current regulatory regimes

3.Be able to evaluate and research regulatory regimes through critical analysis using the theories and academic debates studied

4.Be able to consider future directions of regulatory regimes

5.Be able to interpret and transmit knowledge, skills and ideas on law and regulation to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Students must rely on the approved Means of Assessment which will be posted to the Wattle course site approximately 4 weeks prior to the commencement of the course.

 

Assessment is likely to consist of a Research Essay (100%, 6000 – 8000 wds).

26 contact hours (Intensive mode over 4 days). In addition time for required readings and assessment tasks is required making a total of approximately 120 hours for the course
SOCY8004 Interest Groups, Advocacy and Public Policy Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Recognise the strengths and weaknesses of the research literature related to organised interests, interest groups and lobbying

2. Independently apply relevant aspects of these theories and related methods/techniques to identify and investigate empirical policy contexts

3. Critically assess and evaluate the utility of relevant theories and methods introduced as part of the class

4. Produce written analytical work on a research topic connected to the course

5. Orally present, discuss and critique their own ideas, and the ideas of others in a constructive fashion

Assessment will be by two items of coursework and one in class presentation:

 

1. Essay 1 1500 word (35%) (LO 1,2,3,4)

 

2. Essay 2 2500 word (55%) (LO 1,2,3,4)

 

3. Presentation (10%) (LO 1,2,3,5)

A mixture of lectures, workshops and seminars equivalent to 3 hours a week, plus seven hours of independent study.
POGO8072 Development Theories and Themes (R for MPP and MPA) N/A N/A N/A
POGO8117 Program Management (R for MPP and MPA) On successful completion of the course, you will understand and have the ability to assess:

1.governance concepts and the significance of power in the management of development programs;

2. stakeholder needs and interests through an analysis of stakeholders, civic engagement and gender commitments in development programs;

3. strategies for the management of development programs, including the logical framework approach and risk assessments;

4. integrity and its significance in the monitoring and evaluation of development programs; and

5. the design, structure, operation and review of a selected development project.

•A Project Design: no more than 15 (single space) pages plus annexes. This will be an individual project design write�??up based on the class�??based group work. 60%

•20% – An essay of 2,000 words selected from one of the topics covered in the first half of the course.

•Participation in course, based on attendance, group work, 10%.

•10% tutorial exercises based on addressing key program management techniques covered in class.

6 Hours per week over the 13 weeks including 2 hours face-to-face contact.
POGO8004 Poverty Reduction On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

•know how we fare in fighting global poverty

•gain a understanding of various common measurements of poverty and inequality

•appreciate the ongoing debates on poverty-related issues

•understand some poverty reduction policy practices and options

•identify the key drivers of poverty and the key challenges ahead

Three to four pieces of in-class assessments including presentation and quizzes/mid-term (Learning Outcomes 1-5) 55%

 

Essay (Learning Outcomes 3-5) 45%

A 2.5-hours weekly class including in-class activities. Students are expected to spend approximately 4-5 additional hours on readings and assignments to complete the course.
POGO8095 Development Policy and Practice On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.learn about the key theoretical debates over the approaches to development and critically assess the relevant arguments.

2.be able to explain the role of actors in the development community and the way different aspects of development connect to and interact with each other.

3.be able to identify real life cases to carry out independent research and write an essay to offer structured criticism of the policies and practices concerned.

Assessment will include, seminar presentation (20%), a shorter paper (1500 words) (30%) and a longer paper (2500 words) (50%) 30 contact hours over 12 weeks with a one hour lecture and one and a half hours seminar-workshop each week.
IDEC8007 Aid and Development Policy Students will gain:

i) an understanding of the main debates around aid and other rich country development policies;

ii) knowledge of the economic tools which can be used to assess these policies;

iii) experience in the assessment of particular rich country development policies.

Policy memo, 1000 words (20%), long essay, 4000 words (40%), exam (40%).

 

The policy memo provides an introductory assessment task and provides some real world flavour. The long essay requires students to go into depth on some particular issue. The exam encourages students to engage with the breadth of the course and tests understanding as well as absorption

N/A
ANTH8009 Development in Practice Students who satisfy the requirements of this course will have the knowledge and skills:

•to understand the range of organisations involved in development work and the issues they face in delivering strong development outcomes;

•to critically appraise such organisations in terms of their effectiveness and identify which development institution is most relevant in a particular context; and

•to appraise a development project or policy in terms of the likely political and institutional constraints.

Online Forums (30%); critical review 2,000 words (25%); major essay (45%). Two hours per week in a tutorial format, plus another three hours, at least, reading and preparing assignments.
POGO8044 Global Social Policy (3R/13 for MPA) By the end of this course students should:

(a) Understand the ways in which the global flow of ideas has shaped and continues to shape social policy within and across nations

(b) Understand the governance structures for, and effectiveness of, global social policy-making

(c) Understand the (sometimes competing) agendas and roles of major global actors in the area of social policy

(d) Be able to analyse key ideas and objectives that underpin the social policy models advocated by key international agencies

(i) A brief position paper – drawing on the reading brick – to either support or argue against a particular position.  Students will be able to choose from the following topics: (i) a rights-based approach to social policy; (ii) a human development approach; (ii) a social protection approach to social policy; (iii) user-pays systems; (iv) universal provision.  Students will be asked to take a lead in the discussion in the session when their topic is discussed.  1000 words (15%)

(ii) An analysis of a key social policy of a selected international agency. 2000 words (35%)

(iii) An essay examining the ways in which supra-national or trans-national ideas and policies have shaped national responses to one social issue in one country.  Students will be asked to choose a country other than their own. 2,500 words (50%)

Total of 30 contact hours of seminars, with an additional total of 60 hours reading expected in preparation for seminars.
POGO8048 Public Finance (3R/13 for MPA) On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

• Demonstrate a good understanding of the fiscal framework for taxing and spending and of fiscal policy principles

• Analyse critically tax reforms and policy choices in developed and developing countries

• Research, and examine key issues and challenges in fiscal policy in a particular development or country context.

• Present in depth written analysis of key issues and challenges in fiscal policy in a particular development or country context.

(1)   Class presentation (10%)

(2)   Short written assignment (10%, maximum 1,000 words)

(3)   Research essay (80%) of maximum of 5,000 words on a topic chosen by the student and approved by the subject coordinator

OR: Take home examination (80%) of maximum of 4000 words.

Students will have a 3 hour seminar per week. Students should expect to spend 10 hours per week related to the course including class time.
POGO8025 Social Policy Analysis On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

a) Find and use key sources of data on social security and welfare spending in Australia and internationally, including Asia and the Pacific as well as OECD countries

b) Understand key conceptual frameworks regarding social spending, as well as frameworks for the analysis of distributional effects of public spending

c) Demonstrate a knowledge of methodological issues in the analysis of the effects of government welfare state spending on key social outcomes including inequality and poverty

d) Analyse and assess alternative approaches to social policy interventions

e) Compare the social protection systems of their own or other countries with those of other rich or developing nations

Assessment is through two individual essays. The Initial Essay should not exceed 2,000 words and will comprise 40% of the assessment. The Final Essay should not exceed 4,000 words and will comprise 60% of the assessment. Initial readings for both Essays will be as for the Class Reading list, with self-directed follow-up for further reading. 30 hours of lectures and seminars
POGO8084 Principles of Social Policy On successful completion of this unit you will have:

•demonstrated a working knowledge of key terms, concepts and ideas in the study of social policy and social protection

•assessed the major political institutions and actors involved in the social policy process

•demonstrated a knowledge of how social policy interacts with other areas of government policy, such as economic policy

•considered the roles of values and alternative approaches in social policy

•developed a capacity to analyse and assess alternative approaches to social policy interventions

•reviewed the historical development of the social protection system in Australia and other countries

•compared the Australian social protection system with those of other OECD nations as well as the approaches taken in developing countries

•appraised various Welfare State models and their relevance to Australia and other countries

•considered the social policy issues involved in assistance to categorical groups, such as the aged, families and the unemployed.

•demonstrated the capacity to think independently in the field of social policy’

•developed an understanding of the eclectic nature of social policy and the potential contribution of an array of alternative approaches and academic disciplines

Assessment is through two individual essays. The Initial Essay should not exceed 2,000 words and will comprise 40% of the assessment. The Final Essay should not exceed 4,000 words and will comprise 60% of the assessment. Initial readings for both Essays will be as for the Class Reading list, with self-directed follow-up for further reading. 30 hours of lectures and seminars
POGO8085 Implementing Social Policy On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

1. demonstrate an understanding of the different ways academics have conceptualised the implementation process;

2. demonstrate an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of each conceptualisation;

3. demonstrate an understanding of the nature of key players and their role in the service delivery process;

4. demonstrate an understanding of the factors that facilitate and constrain effective implementation.

1. A case  based exercise (20%) which relates to Learning Outcomes 1 and 2.

 

2. A quiz (20%) which relates to Learning Outcomes 3 and 4.

 

3. A 4,000 word essay (60%) which relates to Learning Outcomes 3 and 4.

30 hours of lectures and seminars
POGO8029 Health Policy in a Globalising World (3R/13 for MPA) By the end of this course students will be able to:

(a) Demonstrate a working knowledge of global health challenges, and the health policy and governance responses to effectively address them;

(b) Contribute to informed debates on contemporary developments in global health governance, such as global health security, health in development and aid, access to essential medicines, and health workforce migration;

(c) Demonstrate the capacity to research, critically analyse and persuasively communicate ideas about health policy in a globalizing world

(i) Global health policy brief. 500 words (15%)

 

(ii) Global health policy analysis paper. 2000 words (50%)

 

(iii) Global health research priorities paper. 1500 words (35%)

Total of 30 contact hours of seminars, with an additional total of 60 hours reading expected in preparation for seminars.
POPH8103 Introduction to Health Policy and Administration N/A N/A N/A
EMDV8079 International Water Politics N/A N/A N/A
EMDV8080 International Climate Change Policy and Economics N/A N/A N/A
EMDV8081 Domestic Climate Change Policy and Economics N/A N/A N/A
EMDV8082 Food Wars: Food Security and Agricultural Policy N/A N/A N/A
POGO8015 Services and Investment Policy On successful completion of this unit you will be able to:

•Demonstrate a sound understanding of the theories of foreign direct investment and the WTO principles of international trade in services

•Demonstrate a solid understanding of the motivations of foreign direct investment and cross-border mergers and acquisition

•Demonstrate a sound understanding of the impacts of foreign direct investment on host countries’ domestic economy

•Demonstrate a sound understanding of national government policies towards and their impacts on foreign direct investment

•Demonstrate a sound understanding of the characteristics of international trade in services and the barriers to international trade in services

•Demonstrate a strong ability to apply international economic theories and the WTO principles to analyze issues in global services trade and foreign direct investment liberalization

The assessment of the course has three parts:

•Short essay (30%): This short essay provides students with the opportunity to use economic theories and the WTO principles to examine issues of foreign direct investment and international trade in services relevant to their countries. Students are recommended to consult with the lecturer when they choose the topic. Students can write the short paper in groups (depending on the number of enrolment), however, each of them will contribute to the paper. The paper should be approximately 2000 words in length (excluding data and references).

•Student presentation (10%): Each student (or group) will give a 20-minutes presentation (15 minutes presentation and 5 minutes for questioning) based on the short essay.

•Final essay (60%): The final essay requires students to use international economic theories and the WTO principles to analyze issues in global services trade and foreign direct investment liberalization. The topic of the final essay will be available on the course outline. The final essay should be approximately 3000 words in length (excluding data and references).

This course will be delivered in an intensive mode, involving 5 days lectures over 4 weeks. Students also need to spend a minimum of 10 hours per week to read course materials, lecture notes, and write papers
POGO8115 International Negotiations: Challenging the WTO’s Food Trading Regime The course provides the participants with extensive knowledge of the architecture of the global food trading regime, its history and the latest developments and challenges. Further, the course will provide the participants with the necessary analytical skills to understand and conduct analysis of agricultural and food trade policy issues. Policy analysis: 30%

 

Problem statement for policy research project: 5%

 

Policy Research Project (65%)

3
POGO8213 The Global Trading System N/A N/A N/A
NSPO8007 National Security: Concepts and Challenges 1.Critically analyse Australia’s national security community

2.Demonstrate an understanding of contemporary issues concerning the national security community

3.Analyse concepts related to planning and implementation in a national security context

4.Understand aspects of professional practice within national security agencies

5.Conduct independent research

6.Acquire highly developed oral and written communication skills

Assessment Task Word Count Assessment Value Learning outcome to be assessed
Short Essay 2,500 40% 3,4,6
Longer Essay 3,500 60% 1,2,5,6
One two-hour seminar per week (over 13 weeks) with the expectation of a further eight hours per week of independent study.
ANTH8032 Law, Order and Conflict in the Pacific Students who satisfy the requirements of this course will have the knowledge and skills to:

Understand the key issues in law, order and conflict in Melanesia

Explain the principles sources of law, order and conflict in Melanesia with reference to detailed case studies of contemporary conflict

Assess the respective roles of notions of social order; state and non-state actors in social control; internal and external responses to problems of law and order in the Asia Pacific region

Contribute to the design and implementation of the dynamics of peace processes and post-conflict reconstruction.

Class participation (10%); Annotated Bibliography (30%), Essay – maximum 5,000 words (60%). N/A

 

Page created by: Ian Clark on 5 May 2015 in original Atlas and copied to this Atlas on 9 December 2015.