Quiz 1 – Getting Oriented

… an Atlas quiz for Atlas206 Internship Reading

6 concept comprehension questions on
Getting Oriented

Note: All 15 quizzes for Atlas206 Internship Reading are available at Concept Quizzes for Atlas206 Internship Reading.

CCQ206.01.01. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term orienting choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. An individual who is oriented can identify and create opportunities to initiate new connections that will facilitate the achievement of strategic goals within own area.

b. An individual who is oriented understands the relationships, concerns and agendas of key people, and decisions made inside and outside of their own work group.

c. Orienting is defined as seeking an expression of assent from others for something you propose.

d. Orienting is defined as positioning with respect to a reference system or determining your bearings physically or intellectually.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.01.02. Among the statements a-d pertaining to the term networking choose the one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. Networking should consist of give-and-take relationships.

b. Successful networking involves making it a personal practice to view every situation – both inside and outside of the work environment – as an opportunity to meet new people.

c. Networking is the ongoing process of cultivating and maintaining relationships with a diverse network of individuals and organisations who share a common set of principles and values.

d. Networking is the process of intentionally meeting people, making contacts, and forming relationships in hopes of gaining access to such business-related benefits as career advice, job leads, business referrals, useful information and ideas, and emotional support.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid.

CCQ206.01.03. Among statements a-d pertaining to organization chart choose one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. An organization chart is a diagram that illustrates the structure of an organization.

b. An organization chart can also be called an organizational chart, an org chart, or an organogram.

c. An organization chart illustrates the relationships and relative ranks of its business units or divisions, and the positions or roles assigned to each unit or division.

d. An organization chart is unlikely to be useful without the names of the people occupying the boxes on the chart.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid statements.

CCQ206.01.04. Among statements a-d pertaining to organization structure types choose one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. There are three main types of organizational structure and one of them will be optimal for a particular organizational mission and culture.

b. A functional structure is set up so that each portion of the organization is grouped according to its purpose, with the potential drawback that the coordination and communication between departments can be restricted by the organizational boundaries of having the various departments working separately.

c. A divisional (or regional) structure is used in organizations that operate in a wide geographic area and have separate smaller organizations (e.g., regional offices) to cover a range of services within the region, with the potential drawback of increasing costs and reducing consistency of service across regions.

d. A matrix structure is a hybrid of divisional and functional structure and allows for the benefits of functional and divisional structures to exist in one organization but the drawback of having dual reporting structures

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid statements.

CCQ206.01.05. Among statements a-d pertaining to the government program choose one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. The Government of Canada defines a program as a group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results, and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

b. Each program has a budget that is described in a document (e.g., Estimates) before being authorized by the legislature.

c. Some government programs are disaggregated into sub-programs and some of these can be further disaggregated into sub-sub-programs, each of which has a specific budget, and is delivered by a specific institutional unit headed by a responsible manager.

d. For management purposes is more useful and precise to specify programs in terms of outputs and outcomes than in terms of financial costs and delivery units.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid statements.

CCQ206.01.06. Among statements a-d pertaining to the Estimates choose one that is invalid or choose e if all are reasonably valid.

a. For governments in the Westminster tradition, Estimates publications explain how organizations plan to spend funds.

b. Estimates publications explain how federal organizations plan to spend funds. The Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates provide information on spending authority that Parliament will be asked to approve during the fiscal year.

c. In Canada, individual departments and agencies also produce Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates and show an organization’s priorities and planned results for the next three years. DPRs, tabled in the fall, are accounts of results achieved during the most recent fiscal year.

d. In Canada, Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) are an integral part of the Estimates process as specified in the Parliament of Canada Act.

e. All of a-d are reasonably valid statements.

Page created by: Ian Clark, last modified on 19 April 2017.

Image: Gordie Wright, How to use a compass, at https://www.snowys.com.au/blog/how-to-use-a-compass/, accessed 19 April 2017.